Show Less

Cognitive Morphodynamics

Dynamical Morphological Models of Constituency in Perception and Syntax

Series:

Jean Petitot

This book – written in collaboration with René Doursat, director of the Complex Systems Institute, Paris – adds a new dimension to Cognitive Grammars. It provides a rigorous, operational mathematical foundation, which draws from topology, geometry and dynamical systems to model iconic «image-schemas» and «conceptual archetypes». It defends the thesis that René Thom’s morphodynamics is especially well suited to the task and allows to transform the morphological structures of perception into Gestalt-like, abstract, proto-linguistic schemas that can act as inputs into higher-level specific linguistic routines.
Cognitive Grammars have drawn upon the view that the deep syntactic and semantic structures of language, such as prepositions and case roles, are grounded in perception and action. This study raises difficult problems, which thus far have not been addressed as a mathematical challenge. Cognitive Morphodynamics shows how this gap can be filled.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Contents

Extract

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1. Purpose and scope of this book . . . . . . . . . . 11 2. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Chapter 1. The Cognitive and Morphodynamical Turns . . . . 15 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2. Morphodynamics in cognitive semiolinguistics . . . . . 16 2.1. Characteristics of the cognitive turn . . . . . . 16 2.2. The path-breaking point of view of Morphodynamics . 20 3. Three main examples of a cognitive approach to language . . 22 3.1. Ray Jackendoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 3.2. Ronald Langacker . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 3.3. Len Talmy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 4. Previous cognitive perspectives . . . . . . . . . . 35 5. The problem of formalization and modeling . . . . . . 38 5.1. The limits of formalism . . . . . . . . . . 38 5.2. Computationalism: the symbolic/physical dualism . . 40 5.3. Mathematization vs. Formalization . . . . . . . 43 5.4. Modeling and schematization . . . . . . . . . 43 5.5. Morphodynamical models and connectionist models . . 44 6. Semantic realism and pheno-physics . . . . . . . . 45 6.1. Thom’s squish and pure “etic” linguistics . . . . . 45 6.2. The phenomenological question . . . . . . . . 48 6.3. Pheno-physics and ecological information . . . . . 51 6.4. Realist phenomenology . . . . . . . . . . 53 7. Morphodynamics and complex systems . . . . . . . 54 8. The problem of Universals . . . . . . . . . . . 55 9. Morphological schemata and proto-linguistics . . . . . 60 Chapter 2. Things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 2. The eidetic kernel of the concept of form . . . . . . . 64 2.1. Verschmelzung and Sonderung . . . . . . . . 64 6 CONTENTS 2.2. The fit with some current ideas . . . . . . . . 65 2.3. The origin of the Verschmelzung concept . . . . . 66 2.4. Qualitative discontinuities and segmentation . . . . 66 3. Objective correlates of phenomenological descriptions . . . 67 3.1. Topological-geometrical explanation . . . . . . . 67 3.2. Morphodynamical explanation and pheno-physics . . 68 3.3. Example: fields of oscillators . . . . . . . . . 69 4. A first cognitive explanation: Marr and wavelet analysis . . 70 5. Global contour extraction . . . . . . . . . . . 77 6. Variational segmentation models in low-level vision . . . . 77...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.