Show Less

Discourses and Tales of Grant-Seeking Activity

Academic Writing and Professional Expertise

Series:

Haying Feng

Grant seeking – the first step in knowledge production – has been an indispensable part of academic life, yet a challenging task for neophyte as well as veteran scholars. We are always curious about how grant winners compose their abstracts, cite previous work, present their proposed study, and negotiate with gate-keepers behind the scene. Building upon ethnographic data and a large corpus of authentic research grant proposals and grant reviews, this book intends to demystify the grant seeking activity. It is an invaluable resource for grant agencies, grant reviewers and grant writers, particularly novice grant writers and/or non-native English writers.
Discourses and Tales of Grant-Seeking Activity is however more than a resource book. It is one of the few studies that draw upon two genre theories, encompass both quantitative and qualitative research approaches, and unite an exploration of macro-level recurrences in discursive activity and micro-level examinations of individual writers’ agency, positioning, negotiation and identity construction. It enhances our understanding of the development of professional expertise in academia and thus will be of interest to researchers in the fields of academic writing, genre analysis and Language for Specific Purposes (LSP).

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Preface - xiii

Extract

xv Preface The main aim of this book is to offer a comprehensive account of grant- seeking activity, and to enhance our understanding of the development of professional expertise in academia. Grant seeking, the first step in knowl- edge production, has been an indispensable part of academic life. Never- theless, in contrast to the large amount of research on post-research activi- ties in general and on research articles in particular, the research on this high-stakes pre-research activity still seems insufficient, despite a growing interest since the 1990s. With two strands of genre theories, the English for Specific Purposes (ESP) and the New Rhetoric, forming the main back- drop for its approach, this book investigates the genre system of academic grant seeking by combining an exploration of macro-level recurrences in discursive activity with a micro-level examination of individual writers’ agency, positioning, negotiation and identity construction. This book takes the view that genre researchers should research writing in terms of both generic integrity and individual discursive ac- tivities in the real world. It is pedagogically important for us to describe regularized proclivities and preferences; however in examining grant- seeking – a unique discursive activity in which more veteran academics than newcomers are engaged – it is perhaps even more important to look at the strategic aspects of genre construction and exploitation, as a re- search grant proposal that follows correct writing conventions and disci- plinary practices is not necessarily a successful one. Moreover, we genre analysts are more than ever concerned about how individuals’...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.