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Collateral Adjectives and Related Issues

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Tetsuya Koshiishi

This monograph constitutes an example of a meaning-based approach to English morphology, which has far-reaching implications on lexicographical, sociolinguistic, and contrastive studies.
Collateral adjectives are Latinate relational adjectives, typically meaning ‘of’ or ‘pertaining to ...’, such as paternal (base noun: father), vernal (base noun: spring), etc. The existence of these adjectives poses serious problems to form-based approaches to morphology because of their apparent derivational status, they provide us with extreme cases where these adjectives and base nouns are formally unconnected.
The author shows that the meaning-based approach has real benefits not only in the theoretical analysis of them but also in their lexicographical treatment and in the description of the sociolinguistics of their use.
In addition, after comparing English and Japanese, the author explains how, in English, the knowledge of these adjectives is not acquired automatically with literacy and hence has come to matter in sociolinguistics terms.

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Foreword by Heinz J. Giegerich and Geoffrey K. Pullum ................ xiii Acknowledgements ............................................................................ xv List of Abbreviations ........................................................................ xvii 1. Introduction ...................................................................................... 1 1.1. Aims ......................................................................................... 1 1.2. The Relevance of Collateral Adjectives to Language Studies; The Structure of the Present Book ............. 4 1.2.1. Collateral Adjectives and their Relevance to Morphology: The Concept of Suppletion .................. 5 1.2.2. Collateral Adjectives and their Relevance to Syntax and Semantics ................................................ 6 1.2.3. Collateral Adjectives and their Relevance to Lexicography ............................................................. 8 1.2.4. Collateral Adjectives and their Relevance to Sociolinguistics and Contrastive Linguistics ................. 9 2. Collateral Adjectives and English Morphology .............................. 11 2.1. Introduction ............................................................................ 11 2.2. On the Basic Concepts and Terminology of Morphology ...... 13 2.2.1. The Concept of the Morpheme .................................... 13 2.2.2. The Concept of Derivation in Morphology .................. 20 2.2.3. Meaning-based Approaches to Morphology ................ 22 2.3. Suppletion in Derivation and the Concept of the Paradigm ... 24 2.3.1. Previous Studies on Suppletion .................................... 24 2.3.1.1. Studies on Suppletion in America before the 1970s ............................................. 26 2.3.1.2. Studies on Suppletion in Europe before the 1970s ............................................. 27 2.3.1.3. Studies on the Lexical Fields and Suppletion since 1970 .................................... 37 viii 2.3.2 Summary and Further Problems ................................... 55 2.3.3 Suppletion in Inflection and Derivation ....................... 57 2.4. Collateral Adjectives and Studies on Morphosemantic Transparency .............................................. 60 2.4.1. On the Morphosemantic Transparency of the Lexeme ............................................................... 60 2.4.2. Ullmann (1957, 1962) and his ‘Morphological Motivation’ for the Analysability of Lexemes ............. 61 2.4.3. Dissociation, Consociation, and Bisociation ................ 63 2.5. A Paradigm-based Approach to Collateral Adjectives – My View ................................................................................. 65 2.5.1. The Paradigmaticity Hierarchy .................................... 65 2.5.2. Inflectional Paradigms ................................................. 66 2.5.3. Derivational Paradigms ................................................ 68 2.5.4. Pseudo-paradigms ........................................................ 69...

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