Show Less

Cultures of Exile and the Experience of «Refugeeness»

Stephen Dobson

Refugee research and debate have focused on international agreements, border controls and the legal status of asylum seekers. The lived, daily life of refugees in different phases of their flight has thus been unduly neglected. How have refugees experienced policies of reception and resettlement, and how have they individually and collectively built up their own cultures of exile?
To answer these questions the author of this study has undertaken long-term fieldwork as a community worker in a Norwegian municipality. Refugees from Chile, Iran, Somalia, Bosnia and Vietnam were on occasions subjected to exclusionary and discriminatory practices. Nevertheless, restistance was seen in the form of a Somali women’s sewing circle, the organisation of a multi-cultural youth club, running refugee associations and printing their own language newspapers.
Moreover, in activities such as these, refugees addressed and came to terms with a limited number of shared existential concerns: morality, violence, sexuality, family reunion, belonging and not belonging to a second generation. Drawing upon these experiences a general theory of refugeeness is proposed. It states that the cultures refugees create in exile are the necessary prerequisite for self-recognition and survival.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Contents

Extract

Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Part I – Discourses Chapter 1 The refugee in discourses of law, nation, gender, class, race and mass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Part II – Cultural, existential and corporeal experiences of refugeeness Chapter 2 Cultural ways of Being in exile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Chapter 3 Refugeeness, self and the body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Chapter 4 Refugeeness, self and communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Part III – Cultures of exile Chapter 5 Doing fieldwork in Verum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Chapter 6 Ten narratives of exile – an overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 6Chapter 7 Growing up in Norway as a refugee of the second generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Chapter 8 Solidarity, political participation and sexuality . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Chapter 9 Reworking oral traditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Chapter 10 The role of the body and the face . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 Chapter 11 Home and family lineage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Chapter 12 The problem of violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 Chapter 13 Crime, transgression and morality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 Chapter 14 Women refugees: subjectivity and solidarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 Chapter 15 The cultivation of ressentiment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287 Chapter 16 Belonging and not belonging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 Chapter 17 Closing comments and further discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315 Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337 Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.