Show Less

The Marginalized Majority

Media Representation and Lived Experiences of Single Women

Kristie Collins

This book presents a cultural analysis of social discourses and lived experiences of single women, a demographic category that census figures indicate to be the statistical «norm» in the United States and Canada – and yet, it remains a group that largely sees itself as marginalized. While singleness and other forms of non-normative lifestyles have been gaining interest from academics and society at large, a distinct commitment to female singleness studies has yet to emerge.
Each chapter looks at distinct features of social constructions of female singleness and/or lived experiences of single women, and textual analyses and cultural critiques are used to develop a richer investigation of the data. The theoretical framework is grounded in a cultural analysis, not only using the concepts thematically to more clearly understand the data, but also calling into question the utility of the concepts themselves.

Prices

See more price optionsHide price options
Show Summary Details
Restricted access

4. Life Course: The complicity of academia in the denigration of single women 147

Extract

147 4. Life Course: The complicity of academia in the denigration of single women To create a family with a spouse is one of the most fundamental ways a person can find continuity and meaning in American (or any) society. I rediscover this truth every time I go to a big reunion of my mother’s family in Minnesota and I see how everyone is held so reassuringly in their positions over the years. First you are a child, then you are a teenager, then you are a young married person, then you are a parent, then you are retired, then you are a grandparent—at every stage you know who you are, you know what your duty is and you know where to sit at the reunion […] But what if, either by choice or by reluctant necessity, you end up not participating in this comforting cycle of fam- ily and continuity? What if you step out? Where do you sit at the re- union?1 In the previous analytical chapters, we considered female singleness through the representation of previously-married and never-married single women in the media and its bearing on the evolution of feminism; through the way in which single women discursively constructed and made sense of their singleness in the telling of their life narratives; and through the way that geographic and economic localities shaped—and were subsequently shaped by—single, female experiences. The current chapter seeks to ex- amine female singlehood from yet another perspective—a theoretical ap-...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.