Show Less

Economic Terms and Beyond: Capitalising on the Wealth of Notions

How Researchers in Specialised Varieties of English Can Benefit from Focusing on Terms

Series:

Catherine Resche

This book, which is aimed at researchers in specialised varieties of English, provides an illustration of how linguists can use terms, i.e. the expression of concepts in specialised fields, as entry points to explore any specialised domain, whether academic or professional, and to get acquainted with its history, its culture, and the evolution of the ideas that have nurtured it. Choosing the field of economics as an example, the author approaches terms from a diachronic, descriptive and contextual perspective, focusing on neonyms, metaphorical, ambiguous or indeterminate terms, as well as interface terms likely to underscore the evolving character of the domain. The analysis points out the role of terms as milestones highlighting key discoveries that have shaped scientific fields; terms can also be considered as barometers of the evolution of knowledge in a specific field and of a changing social environment. Whoever thought terms were only interesting for their definitions or for translation purposes will no doubt be surprised at the insights that can be gained from considering them from a different angle and for other purposes.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Contents 5

Extract

5 Contents Acknowledgements ............................................................................ 11 1. Introduction ................................................................................... 13 2. Terminology, ESP and Specialised Varieties of English ............... 23 2.1. From Wüster onwards ............................................................ 24 2.1.1. Wüster’s most cited recommendations ........................ 27 2.1.2. Another approach to Wüster’s writings ....................... 28 2.1.3. More recent approaches ............................................... 30 2.1.4. Cabré’s Communicative Theory of Terminology, her “theory of doors” and the perspective adopted in this book .................................................................. 36 2.2 ESP vs. Specialised Varieties of English (SVE) .................... 38 2.2.1. A reminder of ESP’s preoccupations over the years ... 39 2.2.2. The specificity of SVE research .................................. 42 2.2.3. SVE researchers’ different approaches ........................ 44 2.2.4. Specialised communities and specialised discourse .... 48 3. From ‘social philosophy’ to ‘economics’: the specificity of economics .................................................................................. 53 3.1. From philosophy to economics .............................................. 54 3.1.1. From social philosophy to theological political philosophy ..................................................... 55 3.1.2. From theological to secular political philosophy ......... 57 3.1.3. From secular political philosophy through moral philosophy to political economy .................................. 58 3.1.4. The emergence of an economic science: economics ... 58 3.2. The quest for scientificity: the physics envy .......................... 61 3.2.1. Economics and the hierarchy of sciences .................... 62 3.2.2. Mechanical physics as a model for economics ............ 63 3.2.3. The emergence of econometrics .................................. 66 3.2.4. Keynes and after .......................................................... 67 3.3. An alternative to mechanical physics: biological analogies .. 68 6 3.3.1. A long, winding itinerary through time ....................... 68 3.3.2. Disaffection and renewed interest ............................... 71 3.4. The specificity of economics ................................................. 74 3.4.1. The goal and nature of economics ............................... 74 3.4.2. Economics as a soft science ......................................... 77 3.5. Concluding remarks ............................................................... 82 4. Insights from economic neonyms .................................................. 83 4.1. Basic patterns...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.