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Ukraine after the Euromaidan

Challenges and Hopes

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Edited By Viktor Stepanenko and Yaroslav Pylynskyi

Ukraine’s protest movement of 2013–14, known as the Euromaidan, and its culmination, the people’s uprising in late 2013–early 2014 became one of the most dramatic world events in recent years. The accession of Crimea to the Russian Federation and military conflict in the Donbas demonstrate that the dramatic dynamics of the country’s ongoing transformation are still far from predictable. This book examines the manifold aspects of Ukraine’s current crisis and its political upheaval. The contributors to the book, Ukrainian experts in a variety of disciplinary fields, explore social, political and cultural reasons and factors behind the country’s transformation in its national and regional dimensions, the impact of Ukraine’s revolution on European and global politics, and also the new challenges of tough reforms with which the country is faced. The contributors share the view that the Euromaidan brought new opportunities for Ukraine’s modern development and the greatest historical chance for the country’s European future since independence in 1991.
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Acknowledgements

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This book presents the findings of a multidisciplinary research team examining the manifold aspects of Ukraine’s Eurorevolution of 2013–2014 and the country’s transformation. The contributors to the book, Ukrainian scholars and experts from a variety of backgrounds, disciplines and regions of Ukraine (L’viv, Lutsk, Chernivtsi, Kyiv, Odessa, Dnipropetrovs’k and Luhansk), explore social, political and cultural reasons and factors behind the country’s transformation in its nation-wide and regional dimensions, the impact of the Ukraine’s Euromaidan revolution on European and global politics, and the new challenges of tough reforms which with the country is faced.

The idea for this book came during discussion at the Ukrainian-Swiss seminar on Ukraine’s Euromaidan in late June 2014. The editors are grateful to Professor Nicolas Hayoz from the Interfaculty Institute for Central and Eastern Europe at the University of Fribourg (Switzerland) for his strong encouragement and support of this initiative. We are grateful also to the excellent Swiss team (Denis Dafflon, Andrej Lushnycky and Magdalena Solska), whose support we enjoyed during the preparation of this book. And the work on this volume would hardly have come to fruition without the efforts and attentive management of Tamara Brunner (University of Fribourg). Our special thanks also go to John Heath, whose valuable help in proof-reading has lent an English touch to the contributions while retaining the Ukrainian voice. Furthermore, we highly appreciate the financial support for the production of this volume from the Academic Swiss Caucasus Net (ASCN), an initiative of the GEBERT...

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