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Italian Yearbook of Human Rights 2011

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Edited By Centro interdipartimentale di ricera

The legal and political significance of human rights has increased enormously all over the world. The Italian Yearbook of Human Rights 2011 provides a dynamic picture of laws, institutions, policies and case law that have implemented international human rights norms in Italy over the past few years, particularly in 2010. The volume has four main sections, which concern respectively: Italy’s adaptation to international human rights law; the human rights infrastructure both at national and sub-national levels; Italy in dialogue with the international machinery; and national, European and international case law.
The Yearbook is the first volume in a series edited by the Centre for Human Rights and the Rights of Peoples of the University of Padua, in cooperation with the UNESCO Chair in Human Rights, Democracy and Peace at the same University. The Centre, founded in 1982 with the support of the Region of Veneto, carries out research and training programmes according to an interdisciplinary approach. It hosts the Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence on intercultural dialogue and human rights and edits the quarterly journal Pace diritti umani/Peace human rights. The Centre also works in cooperation with the European Commission, the Council of Europe, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and UNESCO, as well as with civic organizations, schools and local authorities.
The editors of the Italian Yearbook of Human Rights 2011 include Andrea Cofelice, Pietro De Perini, Paola Degani, Paolo De Stefani, Marco Mascia, Antonio Papisca (coordinator) and Claudia Pividori.

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Preface (Antonio Papisca)

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15 Preface Building the first edition of a national Yearbook on human rights has been a highly demanding task, both in substance and method. It has involved reporting on a reality which touches the very founda- tions of the legal system and civil co-existence: the Universal Declara- tion of Human Rights tells us, indeed, that “recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world”. Our task here has also been to lay out a blueprint for future editions. We have not built over a void, though. Nowadays, thanks above all to international organisations, both gov- ernmental and non-governmental, we can call upon a “glocal” infor- mation and monitoring network to give us data both on human rights violations around the globe and guarantee mechanisms available at various levels. In this context of industrious civic and political engage- ment, however, Italy has not had available a yearly publication capable of reporting on its institutional position on human rights issues in a systematic, comprehensive way, with special attention toward the Coun- try’s many international obligations, and toward the complex system of interweaving relations tying it to supra-national monitoring bodies. With this Yearbook we aim to fill this gap. It is the fruit of research conducted within the Centro interdipartimentale sui diritti della persona e dei popoli dell’Università di Padova (Interdepartmental Centre on Human Rights and the Rights of Peoples of the...

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