Show Less

A Study in Transborder Ethics

Justice, Citizenship, Civility- Foreword by Daniel Innerarity

Series:

Geneviève Souillac

A renewed approach to democratic ethics is needed, one that takes into consideration the management of complexity and memory in a global world. The expansion of democratic ethics for the stewardship of a postnational, postmetaphysical, and postsecular world is the object of this book. It takes as its point of departure current proposals for global democratic justice, but extends these by incorporating contemporary European ideas on border and existential ethics. The privilege of democratic citizenship includes our conscious involvement with our historical destinies, and with others whom we inevitably encounter on our journey of contemporary politics. A post-heroic approach to democratic ethics, one which takes violence and injustice seriously, yet understands the constraints posed on us as historical beings, is necessary. The practices of civility, such as they arise from a normative democratic universe and the ever-increasing role of civil society, can be harnessed for a transborder ethics. The examination of a contemporary democratic anthropology that includes a phenomenology of violence further clarifies the importance of intersubjective processes of encounter, dialogue, and recognition.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Introduction

Extract

À vrai dire, il est bien inutile de se demander si la liberté est naturelle, puisqu’on ne peut tenir aucun être en servitude sans lui faire tort. Etienne de la Boétie, Discours sur la servitude volontaire The expansion of democratic ethics for the stewardship of a postnational, postmetaphysical, and postsecular world is the object of this book. The practices of civility, such as they arise from a normative democratic universe, can be further harnessed for a transborder ethics. A post-heroic approach to democratic ethics, one which takes violence and injustice seriously, yet understands the constraints posed on us as historical beings, is necessary. The privilege of democratic citizenship includes our conscious involvement with our historical destinies, and with others whom we inevitably encounter on our journey of contemporary politics. The history of modernity forms the backdrop of contemporary ethics and politics. However, as democratic justice and global ethics continue to merge, responses to the challenges of a modern world show that we are not at any “end of history” but on the contrary, moving forward. Democratic experience revolves around the encounter with complexity, both temporally and spatially: encounter with difference; encounter with the past and memory, and with potential future(s); and finally, encounter with the vulnerability that accompanies all these mutations. In a post-Cold War world, many have argued the triumph of democracy, and since the fall of the Berlin Wall, democracy looms brightly on the international stage as a model of governance and purveyor of global justice. Democracy...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.