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Forme(s) et modes d’être / Form(s) and Modes of Being

L’ontologie de Roman Ingarden / The Ontology of Roman Ingarden

Series:

Olivier Malherbe and Sébastien Richard

Le présent ouvrage est un recueil d’articles de chercheurs internationaux sur l’apport à l’ontologie du phénoménologue polonais Roman Ingarden. Il contient des contributions sur des thèmes aussi divers que la dépendance existentielle, les catégories ontologiques, les modes d’être, la substance, la causalité, la forme, l’idéalisme ou encore l’ontologie des objets fictifs. Ce volume démontre que la pensée d’Ingarden ne se limite pas à la phénoménologie et à l’histoire de celle-ci, mais est susceptible d’apporter une contribution singulière à la recherche métaphysique contemporaine.
This books is a collection of papers written by international researchers on the contribution to ontology of the Polish phenomenologist Roman Ingarden. It contains texts of such various themes as ontological dependency, ontological categories, modes of being, substance, causality, form, idealism and the ontology fictional objects. This book shows that Ingarden’s thought goes beyond phenomenology and its history, and could be of a valuable interest for contemporary metaphysical research.
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Ingarden’s Combinatorial Analysis of the Realism-Idealism Controversy

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Raphaël MILLIÈRE

University of Oxford

The Controversy over the Existence of the World (henceforth Controversy) is without a doubt Ingarden’s magnum opus; it is perhaps surprising, then, that so little attention has been given to its main goal, clearly indicated by the very title of the book: finding a solution to the centuries-old philosophical controversy about the ontological status of the external world. There are at least three reasons for this relative indifference. First, even at the time when the book was published, the Controversy was no longer seen as a serious polemical topic, whether it was disqualified as an archaic metaphysical pseudo-problem or taken to be the last remnant of an antiscientific approach to philosophy culminating in idealism and relativism. Second, Ingarden’s reasoning on the matter is highly complex, at times misleading, and even occasionally faulty. Finally, his analysis is not only incomplete – Controversy being unachieved – but also arguably aporetic. One may wonder, then, why it is still worth excavating this mammoth treatise to study an issue apparently no longer relevant to contemporary philosophy. Aside from historical and exegetical purposes, which are of course very interesting in their own right, Ingarden’s treatment of the Controversy remains one of the most detailed and ambitious ontological undertakings of the twentieth century. Not only does it lay out an incredibly detailed map of possible solutions to the Controversy, but it also tries to show why the latter is a genuine and fundamental problem that...

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