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Language and its Contexts-- Le Langage et ses contextes

Transposition and Transformation of Meaning?-- Transposition et transformation du sens ?

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Edited By Pierre-Alexis Mével and Helen Tattam

Inspired by a postgraduate French studies conference (University of Nottingham, 10 September 2008), this volume explores linguistic form and content in relation to a variety of contexts, considering language alongside music, images, theatre, human experience of the world, and another language. Each essay asks what it is to understand language in a given context, and how, in spite of divergent expressive possibilities, a linguistic situation interacts with other contexts, renegotiating boundaries and redefining understanding. The book lies at the intersection of linguistics and hermeneutics, seeking to (a) contextualise philosophical and linguistic discussions of communication across a range of media and (b) illustrate their intimate relations, despite differing strategies or emphases.
Puisant son inspiration dans un colloque de French studies pour doctorants (Université de Nottingham, 10 septembre 2008), cet ouvrage étudie forme et contenu linguistiques en relation avec différents contextes, considérant le langage conjointement avec la musique, les images, le théâtre, l’expérience du monde et un autre langage. Chaque chapitre dissèque la compréhension du langage dans un contexte donné, et se demande comment, en dépit de possibilités expressives divergentes, une situation linguistique interagit avec d’autres contextes, redessinant leurs frontières et redéfinissant la compréhension. Ce livre, situé à l’intersection entre la linguistique et l’herméneutique, a pour but de (a) contextualiser les discussions philosophiques et linguistiques sur la communication dans une gamme de médias et (b) démontrer leur relation intime, malgré des stratégies ou intentions différentes.

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Helen Tattam and Pierre-Alexis Mével Introduction: The Myth of Babel 1

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Helen TATTAM and Pierre-Alexis MÉVEL Introduction: The Myth of Babel And they said, Go to, let us build us a city and a tower, whose top may reach unto heaven; and let us make us a name, lest we be scattered abroad upon the face of the whole earth. And the LORD came down to see the city and the tower, which the children of men builded. And the LORD said, Behold, the people is one, and they have all one language; and this they begin to do: and now nothing will be restrained from them, which they have imagined to do. Go to, let us go down, and there confound their language, that they may not understand one another’s speech. So the LORD scattered them abroad from thence upon the face of all the earth: and they left off to build the city. Therefore is the name of it called Babel; because the LORD did there confound the language of all the earth … . (Genesis 11:4–9)1 More than a legend concerning the origin of different languages, the story of Babel is a founding myth, within the Judeo-Christian world, of difference in linguistic expression as the cause of misunderstanding. For not only is it a polemic against the hubris of Noah’s descendents, whose attempt to glorify mankind’s grandeur was confounded, the myth of Babel (literally: ‘a confused turbulent medley of sounds’)2 is commonly understood as 1 From the 1611 King James Version of the Bible. 2...

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