Show Less

Translating Emotion

Studies in Transformation and Renewal Between Languages

Series:

Edited By Kathleen Shields and Michael Clarke

This collection of essays can be situated in a development that has been underway in translation studies since the early 1990s, namely the increasing focus on translators themselves: translators as embodied agents, not as instruments or conduits. The volume deals with different kinds of emotion and different levels of the translation process. For example, one essay examines the broad socio-cultural context, and others focus on the social event enacted in translation, or on the translator’s own performative act. Some of the essays also problematize the linguistic challenges posed by the cultural distance of the emotions embodied in the texts to be translated.
The collection is broad in scope, spanning a variety of languages, cultures and periods, as well as different media and genres. The essays bring diverse questions to a topic rarely directly addressed and map out important areas of enquiry: the translator as an emotional cultural intermediary, the importance of emotion to cognitive meaning, the place of emotion in linguistic reception, and translation itself as a trope whereby emotion can be expressed.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

KATHLEEN SHIELDS AND MICHAEL CLARKE - Introduction -1

Extract

KATHLEEN SHIELDS AND MICHAEL CLARKE Introduction This collection of essays can be situated in a development that has been underway in our field since the early 1990s, namely the increasing focus on translators themselves: translators as embodied agents, not instruments or conduits. The dominant, ‘classical’ paradigm of the Western tradition had involved an ef facement of the translator’s identity, an assumption underpinned by dualist theories of meaning. Was this simply because Bible translation provided the focus point for much of the thinking that was done in this area? Already, from the mid-1970s, descriptive translation studies brought about a significant change of perspective. Translations were no longer seen as finished products to be compared with the source text and potentially found wanting. Gideon Toury and others found rich material by studying the reception of translations in the worlds of their target languages, along with the behavioural norms implicated in the choices made by the translators.1 In this context Douglas Robinson’s book The Translator’s Turn (1991) marks a shift from general patterns of translators’ choices towards a focus on the person of the individual translator.2 Robinson makes an appeal for ‘a somatics of translation’: in such a model, sense and meaning are grounded not only in cognition but also in bodily sensation. Pursuing the theme of embodiment, he calls for an awareness of what he terms the translator’s ‘limbic system’ as opposed to ‘mentalist categories’.3 1 See, for example, Gideon Toury, Descriptive Translation Studies and Beyond (Amsterdam: Benjamins, 1995); Theo Hermans, ed....

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.