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Neoliberal Developments in Higher Education

The United Kingdom and Germany

Rosalind Pritchard

The paradigmatic values underlying British and German higher education emphasise personal growth, the wholeness of the individual, intellectual freedom and the pursuit of knowledge, which cumulatively can be viewed as a form of academic essentialism. However, these concepts were generated within a particular cultural and historical context which has largely been supplanted by neoliberalism. This book studies the emergence over the last twenty years of trends that define themselves in opposition to the traditional university ethos. It addresses the first experiments with private universities in both the United Kingdom and Germany, the instigation of bidding and competition for funding, the assertion of a practical over a theoretical focus in British teacher education and the contrasting views of their institutions held by British and German students and staff. It shows how the antithesis of a neoliberal university system, that of the former German Democratic Republic, was transformed under the impact of unification policies. The author also analyses important social issues, such as gender, in relation to the academic profession, highlighting how the individual may feel atomised despite a discourse of equality. Finally, the two higher education systems are examined within the context of the Bologna Process, which in many respects embraces academic capitalism – the epitome of neoliberalism. The book encompasses both qualitative and quantitative research spanning two decades of scholarship, and reflects the author’s profound engagement with universities and with British and German academic culture.

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Index Aberystwyth 48 Abitur 35, 88, 92, 121 Abwicklung 84 ff, 93 Academic Audit Unit 134–135 academic capitalism 171, 203, 247, 294 academic freedom 2, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 27, 39, 42, 43, 80, 83–84, 97, 111, 114, 207, 209, 220, 227 academic profession 10, 14, 41, 101, 115–120 Academy of Educational Sciences 8, 94 Academy of Sciences 9, 82, 94 access to higher education 284–288 Accreditation Council 277, 279 Adam Smith Institute’s Omega Files 169 Advisory Committee for the Supply and Education of Teachers 152 aestheticisation of labour 3 age participation rate 267, 285, 286 Allègre, C. 255 alumni 13, 14, 121, 180, 189, 192, 197 Anglo-American model 98, 256, 291, 294 ANKOM 288 area training organisations 152, 168 Association of Graduate Recruiters 283 Association of North German Universities 113, 214 Association of University Teachers 37–38, 53, 276 autonomy 4, 14, 19, 21, 31, 47, 101, 111–112, 130, 132 BA/MA 259–261, 266–268, 280, 293 Baden-Württemberg 106 BAföG 7, 69, 91 Baroness Blatch 157, 170 Basic Law. See Constitution (Germany) Bavarian Higher Education Law 113 Bavarian State Institute for Higher Education, Research and Planning 11, 114, 118 beauty of soul 3 Becher, T. 1 Bergen ministerial meeting 259 Berlin Communiqué 259 Bertelsmann Foundation 71 bidding 136–140 Bildung 2–4, 24, 62, 176, 201 Bill of Rights 42 Black Papers 168 Blair, T. 288 Boards of Trustees 105–106 Bologna Follow Up Group 258 Bologna Process 16,...

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