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Culture and Identity in Study Abroad Contexts

After Australia, French without France

Series:

Marie-Claire Patron

This book examines the effects of a study abroad experience on students’ culture and identity and the impact of these effects on their readjustment to their home culture. It explores issues of culture and identity from the perspective of French students studying in Australia. Issues of perceived cultural proximity between France and Australia, a relative lack of prior knowledge of the host country before the period of study and the impact of distance all influence aspects of these students’ experiences. Employing long-term and cross-sectional studies focusing on culture shock, reverse culture shock and cultural identity issues, the author investigates the cyclical journey of French academic sojourners and examines the impact of the acculturation and repatriation processes and the language experiences on their perceptions of cultural identity. Once the students had traversed the difficult stages of culture shock and reached the stage of full recovery (adjustment), they no longer wished to go home. What impact has this process had on the returnees who faced the insularity of their home society once they returned home? Is the French community beginning to acknowledge the start of a brain-drain of the educated French overseas? What are the implications for borderless higher education? What value should be placed on pre-departure preparation from participating institutions and the individuals themselves, both on a linguistic and a psychological level? This book poses questions relating to these issues.

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Index academic culture: 19, 71–2, 93, 108– 9, 112, 115, 119 writing 64, 108–12, 121 plagiarism 109 referencing 109, 117 classroom interaction 104, 108, 117, 120 accommodation: behavioural 45, 250, 270 sharing of, 65–7, 96, 133, 152 acculturation in Australia 53–146, 233, 263, 272 strategies 25 additive identity orientation 300–1, 308 age 19, 27, 30, 48–9, 54, 116 ambassador: self-ascribed role 73, 94, 140, 216, 245, 252–3, 257, 289 unofficial 19, 24, 216, 275, 288, 291–2, 297 ambivalence 78, 85–6, 89 Anglo-Saxon culture 54–5, 162, 187, 269, 290–9 Applied linguistics 10, 13, 24, 45, 51, 185 arrogance 73–4, 77, 84–5, 243, 247, 255, 268, 291 Asian: students 68, 96, 103–5, 121, 132, 272, 276–7 accent 96, 103–05, 133 assimilation 19, 25, 27, 44, 270, 293, 302, 312 attraction-envy paradox 76–7, 84–5, 89, 135, 144 Australia 9, 10, 13, 15, 25, 47, 51, chapter 3, 53–147 awareness: cultural 80, 91–2, 137, 140, 202, 246, 251, 255, 264, 300, 307 biculturalism 130, 132–3, 250, 252, 277–9 bilingualism 10, 183, 192, 236 brain drain 15, 313, 316 BYO culture (Bring Your Own) 58, 131, 271 chameleon-like characteristics 237, 271, 292 classroom etiquette 113–15 code-mixing/code-switching 180, 185, 187, 270 communicative competence 185, 245 comparisons: social 39–40, 223, 246, 254, 258, 265, 270, 291–3, 306– 8, 312 conflict chapter 3, 53–147, 31, 45, 167–233, 248, 253, 270, 316...

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