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Harnessing Linguistic Variation to Improve Education

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Edited By Androula Yiakoumetti

This volume brings together research carried out in a variety of geographic and linguistic contexts including Africa, Asia, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe and the United States and explores efforts to incorporate linguistic diversity into education and to ‘harness’ this diversity for learners’ benefit. It challenges the largely anachronistic ideology that promotes exclusive use of an educational monolingual standard variety and advocates the use in formal education of aboriginal/indigenous languages, minority languages, nonstandard varieties and contact languages.
The contributors examine both historical and current practices for including linguistic diversity in education by considering specific bidialectal, bilingual and multilingual educational initiatives. The different geographical and linguistic settings covered in the volume are linked together by a unifying theme: linguistic diversity exists all over the world, but it is very rarely utilized effectively for the benefit of students. When it is used, whether in isolated studies or through governmental initiatives, the research findings point systematically to the many educational advantages experienced by linguistically-diverse students. This book will be of interest to teachers and language practitioners, as well as to students and scholars of language and education.

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Index academic achievement 18, 54, 266–267 accommodation approach 272–274 appropriation, pedagogy of 88–89 assimilationist education 20–21 awareness approach 274–279 bilingualism 48–50 bilingual education 1, 11, 12 bidialectism 196–197, 236 bidialectal education 1, 211–212 two-way 227, 232 codeswitching 86, 87, 214 creole 193, 259–260 creole continuum 263 critical multiculturalism 23–24 cultural diversity 11, 97 decolonization, ideology of 6, 175–178 decreolization 193 depidginization 193 development, ideology of 6, 178–181 dialect 193–196 dialectal variation 189–190, 293 diglossia 46–47 English as a lingua franca 79–80 English as an international language 5, 79, 97, 103 English-only policy 58, 72, 108–109 expanded pidgin 259–260 ex-colonial language 168, 172–173, 177, 181, 182, 261 first language 49 game theory 167 globalization 3, 11, 47, 4, 72, 77, 80, 139 indigenous language 176–177, 181, 182–184, 191 instruction, medium of 6, 29, 172, 181 instrumental approach 264–271 interactional strategy 86 intercultural awareness 82–83 intercultural competence 83 internationalization 6, 139–140 Kachru’s tripartite model 78–79 language attitudes 145, 158 parents 2, 129, 174–175, 203–204 students 4, 5, 90 teachers 282 language accommodation skill 84–85 language awareness 4, 85, 86, 90–91, 111, 211 language ecology 170 language economics 169 language-in-education policy 33, 106, 167–168, 196 language loss 191–192 language planning 24 language revitalization 191–192 language shift 98–99 lexifier 259 lingua franca core 79, 84–85 linguicism 180 linguistic diversity 1...

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