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Developing Emotionally Competent Teachers

Emotional Intelligence and Pre-Service Teacher Education

Roisin Corcoran and Roland Tormey

Classrooms are emotional places, filled at different times with enjoyment, excitement, anger, hurt and boredom. The teacher’s skill in working with emotional information and in regulating their own and their pupils’ emotion impacts upon what and how pupils learn. But what emotional competence do teachers need? Can they learn this in pre-service teacher education? And should this kind of ability even be categorised as emotional skill, competence or intelligence? Given recent policy initiatives in this area, these questions have become increasingly pressing.
This book focuses on how pre-service student teachers develop the competence to work in and with the emotionally rich life of the classroom. Building on the concept of emotional intelligence, it examines the skills used by student teachers in perceiving and regulating emotions, generating particular emotional states to facilitate particular types of thinking, and understanding the processes of emotional change in their classroom. Drawing on both qualitative and quantitative data, it explores what pre-service teachers can be seen to have learned through an emotional competence training programme and how this impacted upon their teaching.

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Table 3.1 Plutchik model of emotions 26 Table 4.1 Krathwohl’s taxonomy of af fective educational objectives 49 Table 4.2 Interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligences 55 Table 4.3 EQ-i Composite scales and subscales 64 Table 4.4 MSCEIT score ranges 72 Table 5.1 Distribution of sample by college course 87 Table 5.2 Distribution of sample by gender 87 Table 5.3 Distribution of sample by college course and gender 88 Table 5.4 Comparing the mean and standard deviation (σ) for total level of emotional intelligence attained by all participants 90 Table 5.5 One-sample t-test comparing the mean score for total level of emotional intelligence with the average score of 100 for the population (n = 356) 90 Table 5.6 Comparing mean scores and standard deviation for each of the four EI skills attained by all participants (n = 356) 91 Table 5.7 One-sample t-test comparing mean scores for each of the four EI skills attained by all participants with the average score of 100 for the population (n = 356) 92 Table 5.8 Breakdown of experimental and control groups by college course 95 xii List of Tables Table 5.9 Breakdown of experimental and control groups by gender 96 Table 5.10 Comparing mean scores and standard deviation (σ) for total level of EI between test 1 (T1) and test 2 (T2) for the experimental and control group 101 Table 5.11 Paired samples t-test comparing mean scores for total level of EI between test 1 (T1) and test 2 (T2) for the experimental and control groups 101 Table 5.12 Comparing mean...

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