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How To Become A Lawyer?

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Edited By Izabela Krasnicka and Magdalena Perkowska

The present publication collects the contributions of the colloquium «How to Become a Lawyer in Europe», which took place on June 4, 2010 in Andorra la Vella – within the frame-work of the 15th annual meeting of the representatives of the Network of European Universities in Legal Studies.
We gathered articles concerning not only many European countries but also the United States and a special contribution is made to the system in California (USA). Each part is a unique guide through internal regulations leading to different legal professions. The articles present the academic education system in the field of law and also special requirements and professional exams giving the right/permission to perform legal professions. The reader will see the differences and similarities especially in the European systems of the presented countries.

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RAJENDRA PARSAD GUNPUTH - THE PROFESSIONAL AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING OF LAWYERS ACCORDING TO THE ANGLO-SAXON MODEL IN A MIXED LEGAL SYSTEM – THE CASE OF THE REPUBLIC OF MAURITIUS 57

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The professional and vocational training of lawyers according to the Anglo-Saxon model in a mixed legal system – The case of the Republic of Mauritius Rajendra Parsad GUNPUTH Introduction How is the vocational training of lawyers done in Mauritius whose legal system is a mixed one consisting of both the common law and most of the romano-germanic laws? Above all, in the aftermath of its independence in 1968, Mauritius inherited a written Constitution49 which provides for the possibility of an appeal before the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council50, but under very strict conditions51. Nevertheless, there are innumerable questions which arise concerning the exercise of this legal profession in a mixed legal system: how do these aboriginals adapt to these laws, and how are the latter interpreted? First of all, the history of Mauritius’ double colonization must be understood. Conquered by France in 1715, and then by Great Britain from 1715 to 1810, «l’Isle de France» became Mauritius and gained its independence on the 12th March 1968. It inherited both the French and English law, with the consequence of a juridical blend, which nonetheless remains difficult to manage and/or to intepret. 49 Text which is written by the Professor Stanley de Smith of University of Cam- bridge. This English version is translated by the Professor Louis Favoreau of University of Aix-de-Provence, Marseille. 50 Section 81 of the Constitution 1968. 51 Provided the Supreme Court of Mauritius has so authorized or with leave of the Supreme Court. 58 Rajendra Parsad GUNPUTH In...

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