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The Art of Accommodation

Literary Translation in Russia

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Edited By Leon Burnett and Emily Lygo

This collection of essays is a seminal contribution to the establishment of translation theory within the field of Russian literature and culture. It brings together the work of established academics and younger scholars from the United Kingdom, Russia, the United States, Sweden and France in an area of academic study that has been largely neglected in the Anglophone world. The essays in the volume are linked by the conviction that the introduction of any new text into a host culture should always be considered in conjunction with adjustments to prevailing conventions within that culture. The case studies in the collection, which cover literary translation in Russia from the eighteenth century to the twentieth century, demonstrate how Russian culture has interpreted and accommodated translated texts, and how translators and publishers have used translation as a means of responding to the literary, social and political conditions of their times. In integrating research in the area of translated works more closely into the study of Russian literature and culture generally, this publication represents an important development in current research.

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Note on Transliteration

Extract

The transliteration of Cyrillic characters has followed the Library of Congress system, without the use of diacritics. Russian surnames estab- lished in English usage, where they differ significantly from the translit- erated form, have been preserved, e.g. Herzen, instead of Gertsen. The names of tsars are given in their customary English form, e.g. Alexander, instead of Aleksandr.

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