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Negotiating Linguistic, Cultural and Social Identities in the Post-Soviet World

Edited By Sarah Smyth and Conny Opitz

In this volume, researchers in the fields of language in society, sociolinguistics, language politics, diaspora and identity studies explore the contacts between languages and cultures in the post-Soviet world. The book presents a range of perspectives on the effects of migration and of re-drawing of borders among groups and individuals for whom the Russian language has had an instrumental or symbolic prominence. How do recent geopolitical shifts impact on the policies and practices of newly independent states? How have communities and individuals come to redefine their own identities and core values? How does a cultural context in which the power relations between cultural and linguistic groups have been reversed or recalibrated affect the attitudes of each group? How does the potential for transnational identities impact on the interplay between diasporic and homeland communities? How does migration influence linguistic and parenting practices? This collection of fers answers to these and many other questions through case studies from eleven regions in Europe, Central Asia and the Middle East.

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abroad (far- and near- —) 4–5, 91, 93, 102, 254 acculturation 21–43, 143 — measures (explicit and implicit) 23–24, 28–37 — processes / strategies 7, 23, 24–26, 83, 134 functions ascribed to — 292 Vancouver Index of — (VIA) 28 see also adaptation acquisition 24, 143, 195, 279, 288, 293–294, 296 — measures 30 adaptation 11, 21–43, 161, 164, 187–188, 189, 253, 255, 257, 268, 271 psychological — 22–26 socio-cultural — 22–26 see also acculturation age 63, 131, 133, 150, 192, 235, 237, 240, 242, 245, 247–256, 260 allegiance 90, 97, 111, 231, 234, 244 ancestors 228, 254, 263 Armenian 279–301 Modern Eastern — 280–285 Modern Western — 280, 286 Armenianness 300 assimilation 22, 24–25, 32, 34–37, 40–43, 60, 73, 81, 82–5, 226–227, 249, 256 Atlanticists 102–103 attitudes 26–27, 69, 82, 84, 106, 116–118, 130–137, 231 — to (status of ) Kazakh 248–259, 267–268 — to (status of ) Russian 70, 248– 259, 267–268 — to child rearing 147, 157 — to heritage culture / culture into which one was socialized 11–12, 22, 31, 38–43 — to historic events of Soviet past 175–180 — to in-group 46, 113 — to mainstream culture / culture of host community 24, 31, 33, 38–43, 144 — to out-groups 46, 48, 71, 113 — to Soviet education system 167–175 authenticity 22, 43, 100, 220 Azerbaijani 235, 237 babushka 141–161 background cultural — 142, 144, 151, 204, 218, 220, 239 educational — 171 bias in-group — 117, 127,...

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