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From the Lab to the Classroom and Back Again

Perspectives on Translation and Interpreting Training

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Edited By Celia Martín de León and Víctor González-Ruiz

This collection of essays brings to the fore some of the most pressing concerns in the training of translators and interpreters. It does so by acknowledging the primary role of research in both the development and the results of that training. The eleven chapters of the book, authored by a range of established international scholars, touch on the interlocking nature of didactics and research and address advances in cognitive processes, quality assessment and socio-professional issues with regard to their significance for translation and interpreting training. With this volume, the editors aim to illustrate some of the most recent insights into the interplay between scientific progress and the educational stages of prospective translators and interpreters.

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11 After Bologna: Learner- and Competence- Centred Translator Training for “Digital Natives” (Bryan J. Robinson, María Dolores Olvera-Lobo and Juncal Gutiérrez-Artacho)

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Bryan J. Robinson, María Dolores Olvera-Lobo and Juncal Gutiérrez-Artacho 11 After Bologna: Learner- and Competence- Centred Translator Training for “Digital Natives” Abstract The post-Bologna renewal of tertiary education attempted to consolidate a process of informed change based on a move from teacher-centred, content-driven programmes to learner-centred, competence-driven courses. We believe that such an approach to transla- tor training should develop higher order cognitive skills – especially creativity and evalu- ation – and adopt transparent self- and peer assessment so as to favour the acquisition of systemic, instrumental and personal competences and enhance formative assessment. We present the theoretical foundations of our approach, grounded in social constructivism and Vygotsky’s “Zone of Proximal Development”, and describe our course design process, founded on an ordered scale of cognitive skills that matches the realities of the digital era and “digital native” learners. We draw together project-based learning and cooperative/ collaborative learning in the Professional Approach to Translator Training and integrate e-learning with self- and peer assessment tools that enhance formative assessment in an effort to reach out to our learners. Introduction Across Europe, the post-Bologna renewal of tertiary education has attempted to consolidate a process of informed change. Ideally, this entails a radical move from teacher-centred, content-driven programmes to learner-centred, competence-driven courses. In translator training, shifting the emphasis from teacher to learner is less innovative than in other disciplines since many teachers had long ago embraced the social constructivist philosophy 326 Bryan J. Robinson et al. of learning. In translation – a prototypical online profession...

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