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Politics of Cross-Cultural Reading

Tagore, Ben Jelloun and Fo in English

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Marion Dalvai

The last two decades have witnessed an upsurge in scholarship on world literature. In most of this work world literature is understood as a concept in intellectual history, as a cultural system or as a curriculum to be taught. Grounded in three empirical case studies, this book complements such approaches by asking what world literature in English is or has been and what role authoritative readers (translators, editors, publishers, academics and literary critics) play in constituting it as a field for others.
The ambivalent position of English as a roadblock to international visibility and as a necessary intermediary for other literary languages justifies a particular attention to what is presented as world literature in English. By emphasizing the constitutive function of cross-cultural reading, the book encourages reflection on the discrepancy between what is actually read as world literature and what might potentially be read in this way.
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Appendix II: Untapped Resources: A Provisional Bibliography on Tahar Ben Jelloun’s The Sand Child in French

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APPENDIX II

Untapped Resources: A Provisional Bibliography on Tahar Ben Jelloun’s The Sand Child in French

Accad, Evelyne, Des femmes, des hommes et la guerre: fiction et réalité au Proche-Orient (Paris: Indigo & Coté-femmes Éditions, 1993).

Amar, Ruth, Tahar Ben Jelloun. Les stratégies narratives (Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, 2005).

Ammar, Sonia, ‘De quelques exilés sociaux dans l’univers romanesque de Tahar Ben Jelloun’, Les Lettres Romanes, 61/1–2 (2007), 75–87.

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