Show Less
Restricted access

Dominicanidad / Dominicanity

Perspectivas de un concepto (trans-)nacional / Perspectives on a (trans-)national concept

Series:

Edited By Christine Felbeck and Andre Klump

Con unos 20 artículos de investigadores/-as de Europa, de los Estados Unidos y de la República Dominicana, la presente obra interdisciplinaria e internacional ofrece un panorama actual de la investigación sobre la dominicanidad como concepto (trans-)nacional en sus contextos mundiales, insulares y nacionales. Los estudios son fruto en gran parte de un congreso organizado por el America Romana Centrum (ARC) de la Universidad de Trier en el año 2014.

With about 20 articles from researchers from Europe, the United States and the Dominican Republic, this interdisciplinary and international volume offers a current panorama of the research on dominicanity as a (trans-)national concept in global, insular and national contexts. The studies are largely a result of a congress organized by the America Romana Centrum (ARC) of the University of Trier in 2014.

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

The CUNY Dominican Studies Institute: A Beacon in the Production and Dissemination of Knowledge about the Dominican People (Ramona Hernández)

Extract

← 28 | 29 →

Ramona Hernández (New York)

The CUNY Dominican Studies Institute: A Beacon in the Production and Dissemination of Knowledge about the Dominican People

1.  The Beginning

The CUNY Dominican Studies Institute (CUNY DSI) began through the efforts of the Council of Dominican Educators, community activists, academics and students from the City University of New York (CUNY). Beginning as a pilot project, the CUNY DSI was established in the academic year 1992–1993 with a planning grant of $78,372 made available by the Chancellor of the City University of New York, Dr. Ann Reynolds. Trustee of the City University of New York, Gladys Carrión, Esq., the only Puerto Rican in the Board, took it upon herself to garnish support for the project among CUNY Trustees and the University’s leadership. From its inception, the Institute filled an ample gap in the field of Dominican studies –and thanks to the support it found among the different constituencies in the University, including students of Dominican descent– the initial grant was renewed during the following academic year (1993–1994) in the amount of $100,000.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.