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Inspiring Views from «a' the airts» on Scottish Literatures, Art and Cinema

The First World Congress of Scottish Literatures in Glasgow 2014

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Edited By Klaus Peter Müller, Ilka Schwittlinsky and Ron Walker

Where do Scottish literatures, art, and cinema stand today? What and how do Scottish Studies investigate? Creative writers and scholars give answers to these questions and address vital concerns in Scottish, British, and European history from the Union debate and the Enlightenment to Brexit, ethnic questions, and Scottish film. They present new insights on James Macpherson, Robert Burns, John Galt, J. M. Barrie, Walter Scott, James Robertson, war poetry, new Scottish writing, and nature writing. The contributions highlight old and new networking and media as well as the persistent influences of the past on the present, analyzing a wide range of texts, media and art forms with approaches from literary, cultural, media, theatre, history, political, and philosophical studies.

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Fictions of Clairvoyance: John Galt’s The Omen and George Eliot’s The Lifted Veil (Ian Duncan)

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Ian Duncan (Berkeley)

Fictions of Clairvoyance: John Galt’s The Omen and George Eliot’s The Lifted Veil

Abstract: Regarded as outliers in each author’s canon, John Galt’s The Omen (1825) and George Eliot’s The Lifted Veil (1859) belong to a distinctive tradition of tales of paranormal psychology published by the Scottish firm of Blackwood’s. Both authors use themes of fatalism and clairvoyance for a critical reflection on their narrative and aesthetic procedures. The essay focuses on Galt’s exploration of a crisis in the conception of character as a relation between subjectivity and plot.

… Eliot – it’s a Scottish name –

(Hugh MacDiarmid, A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle)

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