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The Adriatic Territory

Historical overview, landscape geography, economic, legal and artistic aspects

Edited By Giuseppe de Vergottini, Valeria Piergigli and Ivan Russo

This volume presents a multidisciplinary overview of the factors of integration between the two shores of the Adriatic sea. The research promoted by the "Coordinamento Adriatico" is dedicated to a range of problems chronologically anchored to modernity and contemporaneity. The study focuses on the situation of the upper Adriatic with particular attention to the intellectual, political, economic, institutional, legal, administrative and artistic expressions of life.

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The Adriatic Territory: Historical overview, landscape geography, economic, legal and artistic aspects (Giuseppe de Vergottini, Valeria Piergigli and Ivan Russo)

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The Adriatic Territory: Historical overview, landscape geography, economic, legal and artistic aspects

The “territory” has undergone a radical transformation over the past few decades, becoming, considering dated, simplistic visions limited only to “empirical” aspects, an ever-more complex concept, distinguished by a distinctly relational character. Gaining movement from this modern knowledge, this study yearns for the understanding of a specific territory, that of the Adriatic, significantly heterogeneous and marked by clear events in a succession of ethnic groups and statehoods.

This is about a story, the “Adriatic” one, already of great interest at first glance considering the events concerning the name of this sea, which has always marked the history of these lands. A sea, the Adriatic, which in the Pre-Classic Period was considered merely a part of the Ionian, acquiring its own dignity starting only from the Roman Republican Period. Later, during the Middle Ages, the Venetians re-baptized the entire Adriatic with the name “The Gulf of Venice”. This name then experienced a vast popularization, but the sea nevertheless always maintained its original name; a few Adriatic ports which Serenissima was not able to make fall under its control remained faithful.

Other significant indicators of the uniqueness of the Adriatic’s story emerge from the complicated sequence of the state structure, characterized by an articulated succession from periods of political unity and moments of widespread fragmentation. In fact, from the beginning up to recent centuries, this area was characterized by a...

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