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Studies on Balkan and Near Eastern Social Sciences

Rasim Yilmaz and Günther Löschnigg

This volume is a collection of empirical and theoretical research papers in the social sciences regarding the Balkans and the Near East written by researchers from several different universities and institutions. The studies include a wide range of topics from economic, financial, political, agricultural, sociological, international relations to historical, cultural, and feminist issues in the region of the Balkan and Near East. The book is aimed at educators, researchers, and students interested in the Balkan and Near Eastern countries.

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Establishment of Beet Sugar Industries in Turkey and Great Britain during the 1920’s (Fatih Damlibağ)


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Fatih Damlibağ1

Establishment of Beet Sugar Industries in Turkey and Great Britain during the 1920’s


Before the establishment of beet sugar industries, some details should be given about the world sugar market of the 1920s. Up until World War I, world sugar consumption was met equally from sugar beet and sugar cane. After the war, sugar cane production gained much more importance and two-thirds of world production was provided by it (Becker et al, 1961: 549). The sugar industry in general suffered from an excess of production and consequently low prices for its products in the 1920s. The ongoing rivalry between sugar cane and sugar beet also continued during the 20th century. At the beginning of the century, beet sugar enlarged its market share more than 50%. After that point, cane sugar improved its share in total world production. This relative failure of the beet industry in the face of the competition of cane sugar did not originate from the contraction of output. Even the 1928–29 commercial year averages exceeded the maximum level before the war. There was a continual increase in sugar consumption, and it had been met almost totally by the planters of sugar cane (The Economic Committee, 1929: 6).

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