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The Role of Computer Education in the Social Empowerment of Muslim Minority Women in Greek Thrace

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Keratso Georgiadou

This book explores the Muslim minority women’s perceptions of how computer education can lead them to social participation. Moreover, it discusses the contribution of (administrative) members of the community to this effort. The analysis of quantitative findings shows that Muslim women in Greek Thrace exhibit a more western-oriented behavioural intention to use computers. By evaluating multiple interviews, the author presents how women use the potential of computer education for social participation and empowerment. In doing so, she emphasises the role of information and communications technology as a window to the outside world.

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Chapter 4: Findings

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4. Introduction

The purpose of this multi-case study was to explore the Muslim minority women’s perceptions of how the computer education could lead them to pathways for their social participation and moreover the contribution of members of their community, in administrative positions, to this effort. The study was carried out in three parts:

The initial part was devoted to empirically validate the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and analyze how it varies across computer attitude. The data collected from a sample of 137 women was analyzed quantitatively, using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS, Version 14); application and appropriate statistical techniques were employed to process the data from the collected questionnaires. The predictors of Behavioural Intention to adopt computers (the psychological variables of Perceived Usefulness, Perceived Ease of Use, Computer Self-Efficacy, and Subjective Norm) were analyzed using SPSS, Version 14. The predictors of Behavioural Intention to adopt computers (the psychological variables of Perceived Behavioural Control, Attitude toward Using Technology and Subjective Norm) were analyzed using Smart PLS.

The succeeding part assessed the benefits of computer education, in terms of the nature and extent of empowerment experienced by 28 women of the minority. The six primary stages of these interviews were:

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