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American Responses to the Holocaust

Transatlantic Perspectives

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Edited By Hans Krabbendam and Derek Rubin

This collection puts the topic of Jewish Studies and Holocaust Studies in a new American Studies perspective. This perspective compares the similarities and differences in responses and their transatlantic interaction. As the Holocaust grew into an important factor in American culture, it also became a subject of American Studies, both as a window on American trends and as a topic to which outsiders responded. When Americans responded to information on the early signs of the Holocaust, they were dependent on European official and informal sources. Some were confirmed, others were contradicted; some were ignored, others provoked a response. This book follows the chronology of this transatlantic exchange, including the alleged abandonment of the Jews in Europe and the post-war attention to the Holocaust victims.

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Going Public In Support: Reconsidering American Public Discourse About Nazi Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust (Jeffrey Demsky)

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Jeffrey Demsky

Going Public In Support: Reconsidering American Public Discourse About Nazi Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust

Abstract: This essay revisits the alleged lack of American opposition to Nazi Anti-Semitism and the disclosure of the Holocaust. Historians have often felt reluctant to introduce fresh theories, methods, and data. This attitude blocked the view on a countermovement of voices criticizing Nazi atrocities, which was much stronger than assumed.

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