Show Less
Restricted access

Human Trafficking as a Quintessence of 21st Century Slavery

The Vulnerability of Nigerians in Austria

Chigozie DDr. Nnebedum

This book is a contribution towards a better understanding of the nature of the international crime of human trafficking. It is an impulse towards finding a new way at the international levels, and encouraging cooperation among nations in the fight against human trafficking and its root causes. The author analyzes human trafficking, which can be termed as «modern-day slavery» and in its complexity and dynamism ends up in the exploitation of the victims for the personal gains of a person or group of persons. A majority of the victims, especially women, end up in the sex industries. In most cases people are transported from the so-called underdeveloped to supposedly developed regions. As a result, women and girls are smuggled yearly from underdeveloped countries, for example Nigeria, to Europe and America.

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Abstract (English)

Extract



Human trafficking can be termed ‘a modern day slavery’ which in its complexity and dynamism ends up in the exploitation of the victims for the personal gains of a person or group of persons. Being one of the fastest growing international criminal business activities, and ranking behind illicit drug (substance abuse) and arms deals (Human Right Watch 2001), human trafficking focuses more on women and children. This is often because their vulnerability in society renders them easy prey to exploitation. A majority of the victims, especially women, end up in the sex industries.

The Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (United Nations – Palermo Protocol 2000) gives what stands as a working definition of human trafficking, presenting the basic elements that should characterize the crime. These elements include the fact that the act of recruitment can include harbouring and transportation of the victim; the means must involve force or threat of force; the purpose will be exploitation (The Trafficking Protocol 2000, art. 3a). The exploitation in question takes two forms: it can be through forced labour or forced prostitution. In either case, the sole aim is to make money through the crime. The chain of beneficiaries of the crime of human trafficking includes the recruiters, the smugglers, the traffickers and the customers.

Human trafficking can happen within a country or across the borders. In most cases people are transported from the so-called underdeveloped to supposedly developed regions. As a result, women and girls are smuggled yearly...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.