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Industry 4.0 from the MIS Perspective

Edited By Sevinc Gülseçen, Zerrin Ayvaz Reis, Murat Gezer and Çiğdem Erol

Nowadays, an end-to-end industrial transformation called Industry 4.0 sets new goals for manufacturing and impacts on business outcomes. With some of its characteristic elements such as IoT (Internet of Things), digital twin simulation models, advanced robots, big data analytics, and virtual/augmented reality, Industry 4.0 is «de facto» going further. The book aims to provide relevant theoretical frameworks and the latest empirical research findings in the area of Management Information Systems (MIS) with the scope of Industry 4.0. The strategic role of Industry 4.0 in the distributed business environment and the necessity to protect and properly utilize its key elements at different levels of organizations as well as in society are discussed.

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Preface

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Information and communication technology has been particularly influential in new directions of society. There is a hypothesis that societies undergo three phases: archaic, socio-semiotic and techno-semiotic. In archaic phase, people and communities live still, nature-bound lives. The socio-semiotic phase was the avenue chosen by the western world in the emergence of modernity leading to industrialization and democratic institutions. In techno-semiotic phase, the society is under the influence of modern electronic and information technology, especially internet and the “extase” of communication, and this changed the previous structures of social organization radically. In this third phase, an end-to-end industrial transformation called Industry 4.0 sets new goals for manufacturing and impacts on business outcomes.

Information is not worth much if it does not serve a purpose. What the purpose of information for an organization is or how businesses use information to improve the company’s operations is in the scope of Management Information Systems (MIS). As an integrative field, MIS focuses on both business processes and information technology. Waves of innovation spread the fundamental virtues of coherent information systems across all corporate functions and to all sizes of businesses in the 1970s, 1980s and the 1990s. Within companies, major functional areas developed their own MIS capabilities; often these were not yet connected: engineering, manufacturing and inventory systems developed side by side sometimes running on specialized hardware.

With some of its characteristic elements such as IoT (Internet of Things), digital twin simulation models, cyber-physical systems, advanced robots, big data...

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