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Flucht, Migration und Integration Flight, Migration and Integration

Eine Anfrage an die christliche Theologie und Diakonie A Question for Christian Theology and Social Engagement

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Edited By Matthias Heesch, Russell Kleckley and Hans Schwarz

Das Buch legt theologische Deutungen der Thematik Flucht, Migration und Integration, ausgehend von verschiedenen kulturellen und sozialen Kontexten, vor. Viele der Beiträgerinnen und Beiträger sind an Orten tätig, in denen dieser Themenkomplex ähnlich bedeutend ist, wie in Westeuropa. Sie besprechen Flucht, Migration und Integration als Fragen an die christliche Theologie und Diakonie. Ihre individuellen Antworten und Sichtweisen bereichern die kritische Debatte über diese aktuellen Herausforderungen.

This book presents theological approaches to the subject flight, migration and integration from various cultural and social contexts. Many of the contributors are active in places where the issue of flight, migration and integration is similarly significant as it is in Western Europe. They discuss flight, migration and integration as questions for Christian theology and diaconia. Their individual responses and views illuminate and inform the critical discussion for the challenges facing today’s world.

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Learning from the Barmen Declaration of 1934: Theological-Ethical-Political Commentary

Learning from the Barmen Declaration of 1934: Theological-Ethical-Political Commentary

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←276 | 277→Craig L. Nessan

Abstract: The Theological Declaration of Barmen was formulated during an historical moment in which questions about the flight and migration of endangered persons was acute. This Declaration continues to provide theological ground for the political responsibility of Christians in response to the flight, migration, and integration of displaced persons in our time.

The Theological Declaration of Barmen was crafted and adopted in May 1934 by a scholarly team whose guiding figure was Karl Barth. The context for this theological statement included the increasing machinations by the German Christians, supported in their efforts by the Nazi regime, to control and dominate the Protestant churches in Germany through the formation of a national church. Up to this time the Protestant churches had existed in a federation constituted of Landeskirchen, regional church bodies related to the state territories within Germany.

The Theological Declaration of Barmen was formulated during an historical moment in which questions about the flight and migration of endangered persons was becoming acute. This document provides theological, ethical, and political implications for the political responsibility of Christians in response to the flight, migration, and integration of displaced persons also in our time. The following sections each begin with citation of particular theological claims from the Barmen Declaration followed by theological-ethical-political commentary.1 This commentary begins with a confession of failure on the part of the teaching office of the church both then and now.

1. „I am the way,...

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