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Language and its Effects

Proceedings from the 31st International Conference of the Croatian Applied Linguistics Society

Edited By Marija Brala Vukanović and Anita Memišević

The effects of language are numerous. Some are known and have been described, other effects are intuitive and are still waiting to be understood, explained and predicted, while – possibly – there might be more effects that we are still unaware of. The book brings together 16 contributions organized into two main sections: The first one relates to the issue of the effects of language in the FL classroom. The second one can, broadly speaking, be subsumed under the heading of sociolinguistics, given that it brings together a number of papers exploring the effects of language on society and/or on the individual. The answers to the questions have been provided by linguists – theoreticians and practitioners - from multiple perspectives. Thus, the conclusions and invitations for further research put forth in the papers collected in this book, should be of use to anyone with an interest in the effects of language, from cognitive scientists to FL teachers.

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Am I bilingual? Factors affecting Croatian pre-service and in-service teachers’ self-assessment of bilingualism (Siniša Smiljanić / Ana Bratulić)

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Siniša Smiljanić

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Zagreb ssmiljanic@ffri.hr; sinisa.smiljanic2@gmail.com

Ana Bratulić

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Zagreb ana.bratulic@gmail.com

Am I bilingual? Factors affecting Croatian pre-service and in-service teachers’ self-assessment of bilingualism1

Abstract: In recent times bilingualism has been recognised as a widespread phenomenon with far-reaching economic and educational consequences. Because of that a lot of effort has been dedicated to its description along different social, linguistic and cognitive dimensions. However, although its importance has been emphasized, one aspect of bilingualism has often been left out from abovementioned considerations – namely how bilinguals themselves perceive their linguistic status. This paper hopes to contribute to this line of research by exploring whether Croatian pre-service and in-service teachers consider themselves to be bilingual and how their perceptions are related to different factors such as gender, age, professional status, age and context of second language (L2) acquisition, L2 proficiency, and L2 use. The sample comprised teaching track graduate students from the Faculty of Teacher Education in Rijeka and the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka (n = 110) and in-service class teachers and teachers of Croatian from three Croatian counties (n = 86). Their biodata, self-assessment of bilingualism and language histories were collected with a specifically designed questionnaire and analysed quantitatively. The analysis has shown that most participants consider themselves to be bilingual and that...

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