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Areal Convergence in Eastern Central European Languages and Beyond

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Edited By Luka Szucsich, Agnes Kim and Uliana Yazhinova

This book assembles contributions dealing with language contact and areal linguistics. The goal of the book is to investigate linguistic convergence in Europe with a strong focus on the languages of Eastern Central Europe which show many remarkable similarities. The focus is put on a methodical and empirical component in the investigation of two or more languages in the context of possible language contact phenomena. Languages of Eastern Central Europe and adjacent parts of Europe use a considerable amount of common vocabulary due to the transfer of loanwords during a long period of cultural contact. But they also share several grammatical features—phonological, morphological and syntactic ones. This book tackles lexical and grammatical phenomena in language contact situations. The authors take up diachronic, synchronic and language acquisitional perspectives, and discuss methodological problems for the field.

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Introduction

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This volume assembles written versions of contributions presented at a workshop organized at the Slavic Department of the Humboldt University Berlin. The workshop was conducted within the project Areal Convergence in Eastern Central European Languages (ACECEL), which was part of the CENTRAL network (Central European Network for Teaching and Research in Academic Liaison). CENTRAL was initiated by the Humboldt University Berlin and founded together with the Universities of Vienna and Warsaw, Charles University Prague as well as ELTE Budapest with the goal to establish joint projects for the promotion of exchange in research and teaching. All CENTRAL projects were funded by the German Academic Exchange Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, DAAD) for four years (2015–2018).1 The primary goal of ACECEL was to investigate linguistic convergence in the languages of Eastern Central Europe which show many remarkable similarities. Luka Szucsich (Humboldt University Berlin) and Stefan Newerkla (University of Vienna) were the PIs of ACECEL which—at different stages—also included the involvement of colleagues in Prague, Warsaw and Budapest. The focus was put on a methodical and empirical component in the investigation of two or more languages in the context of possible language contact phenomena. The partner institutions with focusses in the field of lexical borrowing, in particular for German, Slovak and Czech (Slavic Department, University of Vienna) and in the field of morphosyntactic typology and microvariation in the field of Slavic languages (Slavic Department, Humboldt University) provided an ideal basis for cooperation for the described endeavors. The...

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