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Changes and Challenges of Cross-border Mobility within the European Union

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Edited By Trine Lund Thomsen

This book presents the results of the MIDA-project – the impact of labour migra-tion from the Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries to the Danish labour market. In addition, it includes chapters that focus on labour mobility in other EU countries. The project stems from collaboration between researchers from the former CoMID (the Research Center for the Study of Migration and Diversity) at Aalborg University and the Department of Occupational Medicine at the Regional Hospital West Jutland.
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Chapter 7 Virtual Communities and the Pursuit of a Higher Quality of Life: Understanding Internet Communication Technologies and Social Media Use among Romanian Migrants after Migration to Denmark (Sahra-Josephine Hjorth)

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Sahra-Josephine Hjorth

Chapter 7 Virtual Communities and the Pursuit of a Higher Quality of Life: Understanding Internet Communication Technologies and Social Media Use among Romanian Migrants after Migration to Denmark

Introduction

Romania joined the European Union (EU) on 1 January 2007, and as a result, the Romanian people obtained the right to freedom of movement within the EU in pursuit of labour1 (Glorius et al. 2013: 81). With it came an alternative to a working life in Romania characterised by low wages, underemployment and a generally poor economic outlook. Following, significant portions of the Romanian population immigrated to other EU Member States with the hope of achieving social and economic mobility, or in simpler terms, to take a stab at the opportunity to make more money through labour market integration (Glorius et al. 2013: 71). The availability of data on the total emigration from Romania is limited, yet figures from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) indicate that more than three million Romanians live outside Romania today, and that emigration has increased dramatically since Romania joined the EU (OECD 2012). According to Eurostat, 91 % of Romanian migrants obtained a citizenship in the receiving country – more than any other nationality. The number of Romanian migrants in Denmark increased explosively after Romania joined the EU. According to Statistics Denmark, Romanian nationals constituted the biggest group of migrants who obtained an EU residence permit in Denmark in 2014 (Statistics Denmark 2014), and the number...

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