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Canadian Political, Social and Historical (Re)visions in 20th and 21st Century

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Edited By Marcin Gabryś, Magdalena Marczuk-Karbownik and Magdalena Paluszkiewicz-Misiaczek

Canada trying to bring together Indigenous peoples, "two solitudes" of the French and the British, as well as a variety of poly-ethnic immigrants has mastered search for consensus and compromise as the best response to national, regional, political and ethnic tensions. This book examines how the evolution of various ideas, schemes, projects, proposals and objectives influenced the Canadian political and social present. It analyses how far Canada was able to realize its initial visions and to what extent it was forced to rework and reform them. It takes into account both the ideas which have actually been implemented and the ones which never progressed beyond the conceptual sphere, yet are important from historical perspective.

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Canadian Political, Social and Historical (Re)Visions in the 20th and 21st Centuries?: (Marcin Gabryś, Magdalena Marczuk-Karbownik, Magdalena Paluszkiewicz-Misiaczek)

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Marcin Gabryś, Magdalena Marczuk-Karbownik, Magdalena Paluszkiewicz-Misiaczek

Canadian Political, Social and Historical (Re)Visions in the 20th and 21st Centuries?

Over the 153 years since Confederation, Canada has undergone numerous political, social and historical changes. It owes its current form of government, international position and social fabric to certain visions – or revisions – some of which can be traced back at least to the ideas of the Fathers of the Confederation. Many of these (re)visions have sprung from evolutionary and revolutionary ideas or actions taken by individual citizens as well as grassroot initiatives of various social or ethnic groups. Some have been impeded by the reactionary notions of various adversaries.

Canada is a country which, throughout its history, has been trying to bring together Indigenous peoples, the “two solitudes” of the French and the British as well as a huge variety of poly-ethnic immigrants. It thus considers the search for consensus and accommodation of the needs of its diversified population as the best response to a variety of national, regional, political and ethnic tensions and strains. Since 1867, it has been perfecting its “genius for compromise”1, both searching for new visions as well as submitting to revision the already existing solutions. Although not without numerous failures and injustices along the way, this approach has been gaining universal acknowledgement, contributing to the popularity of Canada’s “brand”.

The contributors to this volume have taken up the task of examining how the evolution of various...

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