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Synergy I: Marginalisation, Discrimination, Isolation and Existence in Literature

Edited By A.Nejat Töngür and Yıldıray Çevik

Studies on the distinguished works of English and American literature of various genres like poetry, plays and fiction are included in this book focusing on and around the central themes of “Marginalisation, Discrimination, Isolation, and Existence.” The aim of the book is to investigate the issues of “Marginalisation, Discrimination, Isolation, and Existence” within the frameworks of gender, colonization, multiculturalism, religion, race, generation gap, politics, technology, immigration, and class.

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XII: (BI-)CULTURAL FISSURES AND (DIS-)SIMILAR IDENTITIES IN LEILA ABOULELA’S ELSEWHERE, HOME (A. Nejat TÖNGÜR)

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A. Nejat TÖNGÜR

Abstract: In her collection of 13 stories, entitled Elsewhere, Home, Leila Aboulela sets out to explore nature of bicultural encounters of people of diverse locations and perspectives. Disparate characters populating her stories share a lot of similarities regarding their longing, aspirations, frustrations and anxieties in spite of the fact that their nationalities, geographies, cultural traits, faith and life styles differ. In her 13 stories, Leila Aboulela displays a multiplicity of characters including Sudanese people living in Britain, British people living in Sudan, a white Scottish Muslim convert marrying a Sudanese woman and a Sudanese woman flying to London for her husband in order to underline that interreligous, interracial, international, bicultural and marital bonds do not necessarily improve or confound people’s lives. The aim of this study is to show that Aboulela’s stories dissect how prejudices, clichés and presumptions complicate the lives of both people with similar identities and people from incongruent cultures.

Keywords: Leila Aboulela, Elsewhere home, cultural fissures, similar identities

Leila Aboulela is one of the writers whose identities are expressed with many hyphens as she has come to be known as a Sudanese-Egyptian-Scottish-Muslim writer. Her plays, the Mystic Life, the Lion of Chechnya, an adaptation of the Translator and a dramatization of her short story, the Museum were broadcast on BBC. She is the winner of many prestigious literature awards including Fiction Winner of the Scottish Book Awards, New York Times 100 Notable Books of the...

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