Show Less

Foreign Influences on Medieval English

Series:

Jacek Fisiak and Magdalena Bator

The volume is a selection of papers presented at the International Conference on Foreign Influences on Medieval English held in Warsaw on 12-13 December 2009 and organized by the School of English at the Warsaw Division of the Academy of Management in Łódź (Wyższa Szkoła Przedsiębiorczości i Zarządzania). The papers cover a wide range of topics concerning the impact of Latin, Scandinavian, French and Celtic on Old and Middle English from orthography, morphology and syntax to lexical semantics and onomastics.

Prices

See more price optionsHide price options
Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Anya Kursova (University of Pisa) - Indirect borrowing processes from Latin into Old English: The evidence of derived and compound nouns from the first book of Bede’s Ecclesiastical history of the English people and its interpretation in the light of natural nesstheory 177

Extract

Indirect borrowing processes from Latin into Old English: The evidence of derived and compound nouns from the first book of Bede’s Ecclesiastical history of the English people and its interpretation in the light of Naturalness Theory1 Anya Kursova, University of Pisa ABSTRACT Old English shows remarkable flexibility, resourcefulness and capacity for derivation and compounding. During the Old English period the language seems to rely on native material and prefer indirect borrowings (semantic loans and loan-formations) to direct borrowings. The phe- nomena of indirect borrowing are precious and interesting, because, as time passed, many of them disappeared being replaced by new waves of direct borrowings. An interesting question is: what is more natural for a language – to borrow a foreign word or to create a new term using the native material? In the present paper we are going to stop our attention on the derived and compound nouns of the first book of Bede’s Ecclesiastical history of the English people, looking for their possible relationships to Latin models. KEYWORDS: indirect borrowings; loan-formations (LFs); loan-translation (LTs); loan-renditions (LRs); loan-creations (LCs); semantic loans (SLs); word-formation; word-formedness; parallel developments; chains of indirect borrowings; redundant formations; Naturalness Theory; system- dependent naturalness; system-independent naturalness; transparency; biuniqueness; iconicity; indexicality; system-congruity; class-stability; naturalness conflicts; scales of naturalness for borrowings 1. Introduction English has always been known as an insatiable borrower of vocabulary, and Latin as the most long-lasting donor of words to the English language. The interaction of the two languages though has not always been homogeneous. The...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.