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Measuring Oral Proficiency through Paired-Task Performance

Series:

Ildikó Csépes

This book intends to provide a theoretical overview of examining candidates’ oral abilities in different examination formats. In particular, it explores specific partner effects on discourse outcomes and proficiency ratings in the framework of paired-task performance. Two investigations, both set in the context of a proposed Hungarian school leaving examination in English, were carried out in order to contribute to a better understanding of the assumed impact of the chosen variables. Study One investigates discourse differences between examiner-to-examinee interaction and peer-to-peer interaction. Study Two explores the impact of the peer partner’s proficiency. The results show that partner effects related to this variable cannot be predicted as either harmful or beneficial since no statistically significant difference was found between 30 candidates’ scores in different examination conditions.

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Appendices 169

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Appendices Appendix A: Description of the speaking task used in Study One The guided role play task was accompanied by the following role descriptions (the examiner-interlocutor assumed Candidate B's role in the individual mode): Candidate A You and your friend (the other candidate) would like to take your penfriend from Britain somewhere in the afternoon/evening. You like listening to pop music, and there is a band in the town playing at 9 p.m. tonight. Your pen- friend likes sports, music and watching TV. With your Hungarian friend make a programme for the three of you for this afternoon and evening. Candidate B You and your friend (the other candidate) would like to take your penfriend from Britain somewhere in the afternoon/evening. You play football, and your favourite football team is having a match this evening at 8 p.m. Your penfriend likes sports, music and watching TV. With your Hungarian friend make a programme for the three of you for this afternoon and evening. 171 Appendix B: Transcription notations used in Study One Transcription notation: // overlapping turns end of overlaps no gap between utterances micropause short ++ somewhat longer pause +++ a long pause we::11 the colon indicates that the syllable is lengthened WOW capital letters indicate loudness stress underlined words are stressed rising intonation slightly rising intonation, speaker is continuing emphatic tone ) can't hear the passage (( non-verbal sounds, e.g. cough/ laughter egy italicised words are in Hungarian 172 Appendix C: Transcription of the oral performances in Study One...

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