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Barbara Skarga in Memoriam

Series:

Magdalena Sroda and Jacek Migasinski

This volume is dedicated to Barbara Skarga – her works, profile and biography. It is a unique character in the Polish intellectual life, but also virtually unknown abroad, except a meager milieu of her readership in France. Dubbed «the first Lady of Polish Philosophy» for a good reason, she contributed not only to shape of Polish Philosophy but to the style of public debate, too. The problem areas initiating her philosophy stemmed from the group of scholars called «the Warsaw school of history of Ideas» with its flagship names such as Leszek Kołakowski, Brinisław Baczko or Andrzej Walicki. On the other hand, her output originates from the extraordinary and dramatic events of her life. The philosophical output of Barbara Skarga is thus a proof of continuity and longevity of an important tradition of the 20 th century Polish Philosophy.

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Professor Barbara Skarga’s Ceremonial Lecture

Extract

Your Magnificence, Your Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen! Words truly fail to express how grateful I am for the honor you have bestowed on me. May I thank the University, the Rector, the Senate, and all those who have contri- buted their efforts to implement the project, above all Prof. Lech Witkowski, my col- league, student, and friend of many years. I also thank my colleagues and friends who have supported the move by the University, sparing no praise for my career, even though I doubt if I deserve them in every respect. This high distinction demonstrates acceptance of, and recognition for, my philo- sophical work—something every intellectual dreams of. I cannot deny how moved I am. However, today has yet another meaning for me. I have a feeling that my life has come full circle, that I am returning to the beginnings of my path, to the place where I began my philosophical studies—to King Stephen Báthory University. I keep finding its traces in these Toru walls—traces of my professors and friends, both the close o- nes and those I only know by name and face. Amongst them is the first pro-rector of Nicolaus Copernicus University, Prof. Wadysaw Dziewulski, whose home in Vilnius I often visited owing to my close relations with his daughters. Along with one of them, I was tried by the War Tribunal of the Lithuanian Republic and exiled to the East. I remember Professors Jan Pruffer, Leon Lemanowicz, Zofia Abramowicz, and so...

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