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Great Expectations: Futurity in the Long Eighteenth Century

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Edited By Mascha Hansen and Jürgen Klein

What did eighteenth-century men and women think about when they contemplated the future? What was hidden in the «dark bosom of futurity», as Richardson’s Pamela calls it? Do all types of literature that supply a critique of the present conjure up an idealized past or a vision of a better future? Predictions and prophecies – not only astrological but also political ones, utopian models, theological concepts like predestination, progress in the sciences, and, last but not least, life-after-death, both in the form of secular fame and the immortal soul, are among the topics addressed by the essays collected in this volume.

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Introduction……………………………………………………………………. 11 Mascha Hansen Providence, Disturbance, and the Immortality of the Soul Miracle versus Mayhem: Disturbances of the Future in a Long Eighteenth Century That Thought It Might Be Short…………. 27 Kevin L. Cope ‘Not in Utopia, Subterranean Fields, Heaven Knows Where’: or, Apocalypse When?................................................................................ 43 Hermann J. Real Rewriting the Divine-Right Theory for the Whigs: The Political Implications of Shaftesbury’s Treatment of the Doctrine of Futurity in his Characteristicks………………………. 67 Patrick Müller Edmund Burke, Futurity and Providence………………………………... 89 Norbert Col Posterity, Fame, and Existence after Death The Futurity of Fame: Eighteenth-Century Paths to Immortality………. 107 Bärbel Czennia ‘Suppose me dead; and then suppose ...’: Swift in Lively Anticipation…………………………………………......131 Allan Ingram Lord Hervey, Death and Futurity……………………………………….. 141 Bill Overton Great Expectations? Plans and Planning in Women’s Memoirs………………………….…... 161 Mascha Hansen Progress, Prophesy and Scientific Theory ‘He at first sight cou’d each Ones Fortune tell’: Physiognomy and Fortune-Telling in the Early to Mid-Eighteenth Century…………...183 Katherine Aske ‘Only Kept Up by the Credulous and Ignorant’: Eighteenth-Century Responses to the Ancient Beliefs about Menstrual Blood………………………………………………….. 205 Sara Read ‘Let me collect myself, and pursue my journey’: Generation in Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy……………………... 223 Hélène Dachez Past, Present and Future Enlightenment The Critique of Utopianism: Gibbon vs. Godwin…....…………………. 239 Michael Szczekalla ‘The Forty-Five’: British Modernisation and the First Glimpses of the End of the Historical Chronotope……….. 253 Jürgen Klein ‘Old lamps for new’: The Rise of the Oriental Tale in the Eighteenth Century and Its Influence on...

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