Show Less

Eminent Lives in Twentieth-Century Science and Religion

With chapters on: Rachel Carson, Charles A. Coulson, Theodosius Dobzhansky, Arthur S. Eddington, Albert Einstein, Ronald A. Fisher, Julian Huxley, Pascual Jordan, Robert A. Millikan, Ivan P. Pavlov, Michael I. Pupin, Abdus Salam, Edward O. Wilson

Edited By Nicolaas A. Rupke

Can science and religion coexist in harmony? Or is conflict inevitable? In this volume an international team of distinguished scholars addresses these enduring yet urgent questions by examining the lives of thirteen eminent twentieth-century scientists whose careers were marked by the interaction of science and religion: Rachel Carson, Charles A. Coulson, Theodosius Dobzhansky, Arthur S. Eddington, Albert Einstein, Ronald A. Fisher, Julian Huxley, Pascual Jordan, Robert A. Millikan, Ivan P. Pavlov, Michael I. Pupin, Abdus Salam, and Edward O. Wilson. The richly empirical studies show a diversity of creative engagements between science and religion that defy efforts to set the two at odds.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

ARIE LEEGWATER Charles Alfred Coulson (1910-74) 73

Extract

Charles Alfred Coulson: Mixing Methodism and Quantum Chemistry ARIE LEEGWATER MY EPITAPH Here lies a youth, Who loved, Who lived, And who learned to give God thanks for that love and for that life. (CP: MS 19, A.19.1)1 Will you reflect for a moment on some of the things that I have been saying? I de- scribed a bond, a normal simple chemical bond: and I gave many details of its character (and I could have given many more). Sometimes it seems to me that a bond between two atoms has become so real, so tangible, so friendly that I can ahmst see it. And then I awake with a little shock; for a chemical bond is not a real thing: it does not exist: no-one has ever seen it, no-one ever can. It is a fig- ment of our imagination. (Coulson 1955c, 2084) Not only is science biological and social: it is artistic and vocational, i.e. is of the spirit [...] science is itself an essentially religious activity. (Coulson 1954a, 331) Introduction: two separate persons? This chapter is configured about a person, a religious tradition and a nas- cent theoretical discipline. The three quotations cited highlight three im- portant aspects or moments of the life of the English scientist Charles A. Coulson (1910-74): an epitaph, written soon after his conversion exper- ience at Cambridge University at the age of 19 in 1930; the summary of the Tilden Lecture delivered in 1951 on the elusive character of the chemical bond,...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.