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Eminent Lives in Twentieth-Century Science and Religion

With chapters on: Rachel Carson, Charles A. Coulson, Theodosius Dobzhansky, Arthur S. Eddington, Albert Einstein, Ronald A. Fisher, Julian Huxley, Pascual Jordan, Robert A. Millikan, Ivan P. Pavlov, Michael I. Pupin, Abdus Salam, Edward O. Wilson

Edited By Nicolaas A. Rupke

Can science and religion coexist in harmony? Or is conflict inevitable? In this volume an international team of distinguished scholars addresses these enduring yet urgent questions by examining the lives of thirteen eminent twentieth-century scientists whose careers were marked by the interaction of science and religion: Rachel Carson, Charles A. Coulson, Theodosius Dobzhansky, Arthur S. Eddington, Albert Einstein, Ronald A. Fisher, Julian Huxley, Pascual Jordan, Robert A. Millikan, Ivan P. Pavlov, Michael I. Pupin, Abdus Salam, and Edward O. Wilson. The richly empirical studies show a diversity of creative engagements between science and religion that defy efforts to set the two at odds.

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JAMES MOORE Ronald Aylmer Fisher (1890-1962) 179

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Ronald Aylmer Fisher: A Faith Fit for Eugenies JAMES MOORE [f]aith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone. Yea, a man may say, Thou hast faith, and I have works: shew me thy faith without thy works, and I will shew thee my faith by my works. James 2:17-18' And Jesus, walking by the sea of Galilee, saw two brethren casting a net into the sea: for they were fishers. And he saith unto them, Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men. Matthew 4:18-19 "Wilt thou know, 0 vain man, that faith without works is dead?" Not for James, head of the Jerusalem church, any self-serving divorce between belief and conduct — St Paul's authority to the contrary notwithstanding: "[B]y grace are ye saved through faith [...] it is the gift of God: not of works, lest any man should boast" (Ephesians 2:8-9). "Not of works," Paul insisted; not "without works," answered James. The clash that shook the early church would divide believers through the ages: faith versus works — which is necessary for salvation? Augustine (354-430), the fifth-century bishop, rebuked the lay-monk Pelagius (354- 420/440) for denying the Pauline teaching. Luther (1483-1546), Augustine's disciple, confronted an indulgent Roman Church with Paul's words, demoting James' "epistle of straw" in his translation of the New Testament. Calvin (1509-64), cued by Luther, deduced his stern theology of predestination from the Augustinian doctrine of grace; and euer since, Reformed Protestants have set faith above works as...

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