Show Less

Translationswissenschaftliches Kolloquium II

Beiträge zur Übersetzungs- und Dolmetschwissenschaft (Köln/Germersheim)

Series:

Barbara Ahrens, Silvia Hansen-Schirra, Monika Krein-Kühle and Michael Schreiber

Nach dem Erscheinen des Bandes Translationswissenschaftliches Kolloquium I (2009) geht die Veröffentlichung von Beiträgen zur Übersetzungs- und Dolmetschwissenschaft in die zweite Runde. Die Beiträge dieses Bandes basieren wiederum auf Vorträgen, die am Institut für Translation und Mehrsprachige Kommunikation der Fachhochschule Köln sowie am Fachbereich Translations-, Sprach- und Kulturwissenschaft der Universität Mainz in Germersheim gehalten wurden. Der Band ist den folgenden Rahmenthemen gewidmet: Translation und Philosophie, Community Interpreting: Dolmetschen im medizinisch-sozialen Bereich, Translationstechnologien, korpusbasierte Translationswissenschaft sowie multimediale Übersetzung.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

John W. Stanley: Translation – Interpretation: A Phenomenological Analysis of Some Distinguishing Characteristics from the Vantage Point of Translational Hermeneutics

Extract

29 John W. Stanley Translation – Interpretation: A Phenomenological Analysis of Some Distinguishing Characteristics from the Vantage Point of Translational Hermeneutics “[Q]uestions about how we can know what really happens are an inevitable part of a dis- cipline’s formative years. To fully appreciate the merits and drawbacks of the available approaches, we apparently require more research into research, i.e., efforts to validate the relevance of our methodologies and to avoid counterproductive or misleading ones.” (Shlesinger 2000, 13) “Die Zeitstruktur des Sprechens und des Lesens stellt ein weithin unerforschtes Prob- lemgebiet dar.“ (Gadamer 1986, 256) 1 Translation Process Research, Introspection, and Translation Studies in Germany Process-based research in the field of translation studies in Germany – while perhaps no longer in its infancy – is still quite young. Its short life span is in part a consequence of the product-based orientation of translation studies in its early years, in as much as this distracted from any interest in cognitive processes. Yet there is more to it than that: The difficulties inherent in process-based research were and still are daunting. Even if one does not share the frequently expressed “doubt” concerning our ability to gain “direct access to these [cognitive] processes” (Nisbett 1977: 238)1, expressions such the “possibility cloud” (Hönig 1997: 58) or the “black box” (Ahrens 2010: 237), used by scholars involved in process-based research to describe the cognitive processes underlying linguistic mediation, give a fairly accurate first impression of the obstacles one faces when trying to raise many of these...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.