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Translation Studies and Eye-Tracking Analysis

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Sambor Grucza, Monika Pluzycka and Justyna Alnajjar

For some time already, a discourse within the field of Translation Studies has increasingly focused on the translator, his/her translation properties and mental processes resulting from their application. Recent years and advances in technology have opened up many possibilities of gaining a deeper insight into these processes. This publication presents the theoretical foundations, the results of scientific experiments, and a broad range of questions to be asked and answered by eye-tracking supported translation studies. The texts have been arranged into two thematic parts. The first part consists of texts dedicated to the theoretical foundations of Translation Studies-oriented eye-tracking research. The second part includes texts discussing the results of the experiments that were carried out.

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Heat Maps, Gaze Plots . . . and What Next? The Access to Translation Competences and Translation Processes: Sambor Grucza

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Heat Maps, Gaze Plots . . . and What Next? The Access to Translation Competences and Translation Processes Sambor Grucza (University of Warsaw) Introduction For some time already, a discourse within the field of translation studies has increasingly focused on the translator, his/her translation properties and mental processes resulting from their application. Recent years and advances in technology, have opened up many possibilities of gaining a deeper insight into these processes (see S. Grucza 2011). In the first part of this article I shall characterize the object of translation studies and attempt to introduce the possibilities of its cognition (cf. S. Grucza 2010). In the second part, I shall briefly present the capabilities and limitations of equipment-based cognition in translation studies, with particular emphasis on the applicability of eye-tracking research to translation studies. 1. Translation competences Real translation competences are located in the human brain. What it means is that no translation competence, nor any other type of competence for that matter, is available for direct observation. Competence models, on the other hand, are intellectual generalizations, idealizations, models of a particular set of real competences. Therefore, to begin with, a distinction should be made between real translation competences and translation competence models and then, between the reconstructions (descriptions) of actual translation competences and idealized translation competences models. This implies that the designata of the term ‘translation competence’ should be categorized into the following two groups (a) real translation competences i.e. the competences of particular translators (idiocompetences) and (b) intellectual constructs, the ideal models...

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