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Application Coordination in Pervasive Systems

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Verena Majuntke

Pervasive applications are designed to support users in their daily life. For this purpose, applications interact with their environment, i.e. their context. They are able to adapt themselves to context changes or to explicitly change the context via actuators. If multiple applications are executed in the same context, interferences are likely to occur. To manage interferences, a coordination framework is presented in this thesis. Interferences are detected using a context model and information about applications’ interaction with the context. The resolution of interference is achieved through a coordinated application adaptation. The thesis introduces the theoretical concepts, presents a prototypical implementation and evaluates the prototype through extensive measurements.

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2.1 Smart Environment (SE) [Sch07] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.2 Smart Peer Groups (SPG) [Sch07] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2.3 Interferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 3.1 Multi-Platform Pervasive System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 5.1 Cross-System Coordination Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 5.2 Overview: Application Coordination Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 5.3 Interface: Instructable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 5.4 Input Matrix of Applications and Context Configurations . . . . . . . . . . 92 5.5 Pruning Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 6.1 Overview: Data Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 6.2 Interference Detection: Component Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 6.3 Interference Resolution: Component Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 6.4 Application Coordination: Component Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 6.5 Coordinator Setup Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 7.1 UML: Coordinator Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 7.2 UML: Context Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 7.3 UML: Coordinator Management Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 7.4 Context Ontology Extract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 7.5 UML: Context Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 7.6 UML: Interference Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 7.7 UML: Interference Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 xiii xiv List of Figures 7.8 Coordinator as BASE Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 8.1 Overview: Application Coordination Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 8.2 Measurement Results for BasicInterferenceDetection . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 8.3 Interference Resolution: r = 1, i = 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 8.4 Interference Resolution:: r = m/2, i = 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 8.5 Ordering vs. Non-Ordering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

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