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Information Seeking Stopping Behavior in Online Scenarios

The Impact of Task, Technology and Individual Characteristics

Series:

Erik Hemmer

The growing amount of information provided via web-based information technologies forces the users of these technologies to stop seeking for information before having acquired all available information. This stopping decision is either made actively following clear guidelines or subconsciously based on the seeker’s intuition. This book analyzes the aforementioned duality by developing and testing a multi-theoretical research model dealing with information seeking stopping behavior in online scenarios. Thus, by delivering insights into the mechanisms that influence information seeking activities, this study does not only advance theory building in the Information Systems discipline and adjacent fields but is also highly relevant for practitioners and developers of information technology.

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List o f Tables 2.1. Reviewed IS Top Journals and Number of Articles Selected . . . . 13 2.2. Cognitive Stopping R ules 33 2.3. Selected Theories Used in Extant Literature on Information Seek­ ing and Stopping B ehav io r 37 2.4. Variety of Terms Attached to Dual-Processes 40 2.5. Definition of Model Constructs 64 2.6. Summary of H y p o th eses 68 3.1. Heart Rate Variability Metrics Based on Frequency Domain Methods 80 3.2. List of Experimental M anipulations 90 3.3. Operationalization of the Construct Perceived task complexity . . 93 3.4. Operationalization of the Construct Perceived task experience . . 94 3.5. Operationalization of the Construct Perceived task motivation . . 95 3.6. Operationalization of the Constructs System 1 information pro­ cessing and System 2 information processing 97 3.7. Operationalization of the Constructs Propensity to use experiential / rational stopping r u l e s ...................................................................... 99 4.1. Subject Age and Processing Times ................................................... 106 4.2. Paired t-Test of High Frequency Component for Task 3 versus Task 6 and Task 4 versus Task 6 Including Test for Normal Dis­ tribution ................................................................................................... 108 4.3. Operationalization of the Construct Perceived source credibility . . 112 5.1. Overview of Experimental C onditions................................................ 117 5.2. Participation in the E xperim ent..........................................................118 5.3. Age of S u b je c ts ...................................................................................... 119 5.4. Indicator Reliability .............................................................................126 5.5. Construct Reliability and Convergent V a lid ity ................................128 xvi List o f Tables 5.6. Discriminant Validity: Squared Correlations Between Model Con­ structs ...................................................................................................... 130 5.7. Impacts on System 1 and System 2 Information Processing . . . . 132 5.8. Effect...

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