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Self-based Anaphora in Early Modern English

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Ewa Kucelman

This book is a corpus-based study which aims to describe the class of self-pronouns as used in the Early Modern English period. Self-pronouns are presented as a multi-functional class, with two main functions, as emphatic forms and as reflexive markers. The emphatic function is seen as a continuation of an earlier state of affairs, whereas the reflexive function is described as a new, emerging one. As reflexive markers, self-pronouns in Early Modern English compete with personal pronouns. Therefore the book seeks to present the conditions of their distribution ranging from configurational and thematic through discursive to pragmatic factors involved in the choice of the reflexive strategy.

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Acknowledgements............................................................................................... 9 Series Foreword .................................................................................................. 11 Preface................................................................................................................. 13 Chapter 1 SELF pronouns as bound anaphors ................................................................ 17 1.1 Introduction................................................................................................. 17 1.2 Basic assumptions....................................................................................... 18 1.2.1 Locality: Binding domains ............................................................... 19 1.2.2 The command requirement............................................................... 21 1.3 Some challenges to the Standard Binding Theory...................................... 24 1.3.1 Non-complementary environments .................................................. 24 1.3.2 Long distance anaphora.................................................................... 25 1.4 Binding conditions as restrictions on reflexive predicates ......................... 30 1.5. Syntactic and semantic predicates .............................................................. 33 1.6 Some problems with coindexation.............................................................. 34 1.7 Conclusions................................................................................................. 35 Chapter 2 Pragmatic approaches to SELF pronouns...................................................... 37 2.1 Introduction................................................................................................. 37 2.2 Pragmatic interpretation of SELF pronouns ............................................... 38 2.3 Non-local antecedent-anaphor relationships............................................... 41 2.3.1 Logophoric interpretation of anaphors ............................................. 41 2.3.2 Reflexives as viewpoint markers...................................................... 44 2.3.3 Viewpoint interpretation of picture nouns ....................................... 45 2.3.4 SELF pronouns as intensives ........................................................... 49 2.3.4.1 The form of the intensive SELF pronoun and its relationship with other intensives ............................ 50 2.3.4.2 Factors licensing the use of intensive pronouns.................. 51 2.4 The relationship between intensives and reflexives ................................... 57 2.5. Conclusions................................................................................................. 59 6 Contents Chapter 3 Some remarks on the history of SELF pronouns........................................... 61 3.1 Introduction................................................................................................. 61 3.1.1 Types of reflexive markers............................................................... 62 3.2 The historical development of SELF reflexives ......................................... 64 3.2.1 Old English....................................................................................... 64 3.2.2 Middle English ................................................................................. 65 3.2.2.1 The development of the self-compound .............................. 65 3.2.2.2 The choice of a reflexive strategy ....................................... 67 3.2.3 Early Modern English and later ......................................................... 69 3.2.4. Foreign influences and rivalling strategies ....................................... 70 3.3. Accounts of the grammaticalization of reflexive SELF forms ................... 72 3.3.1 van Gelderen’s account .................................................................... 72 3.3.2 Keenan’s account ............................................................................. 74 3.4 Conclusions................................................................................................... 75 Chapter 4 Bound reflexive...

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