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Institutional and Livelihood Changes in East African Forest Landscapes

Decentralization and Institutional Change for Sustainable Forest Management in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Ethiopia

Edited By Franz Gatzweiler

This book presents research articles and essays which analyze the consequences of decentralization on forest conditions and livelihoods in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Ethiopia. Authors from the East African collaborative research centers of the International Forestry Resources and Institutions (IFRI) Research Program demonstrate that the institutional changes resulting from decentralization create costs for those who need to re-institutionalize and re-organize the management of forest and land resources. This requires investment into information, communication, education and into the re-building of social capital. Cases in which collective action has worked and contributed to improving livelihoods and forest conditions can be exemplary, while failures can be equally useful for learning about East Africa and beyond.

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Chapter 10 Traditional Forest Use and Institutional Change: Case Study of Loita Community Forest, Narok South District, Kenya: Roxventa A. Ongugo, Purity A. Osumba, Pasiens M. Tuzo

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175 Chapter 10 Traditional Forest Use and Institutional Change: Case Study of Loita Community Forest, Narok South District, Kenya Roxventa A. Ongugo, Purity A. Osumba, Pasiens M. Tuzo 10.1 Abstract Traditional forest use and governance have been practiced among pastoralist communities for many decades. Traditional forest governance is practiced in forests that are owned by homogeneous communities such as the Maasai of Kenya. The Maasai community lives adjacent to Loita forest in Narok South district and Mukogodo forest in Laikipia district of Kenya. This chapter focuses on the Maa- sai community living adjacent to the Loita forest. Since time immemorial they have relied on the forest for their livelihoods. They use the forest for initiation, as a shrine and for livestock grazing. Historically, entry into the forest was sub- ject to permission from the Oloibon (a traditional community leader), but with time this responsibility has been transferred to the village elders. The forest go- vernance structure was therefore based on traditional leadership. The objective of this study is to analyse how the Loita Maasai community used their forest re- sources and document how the community governance structure has changed over time. The study also looks at how the change from traditional to modern lifestyle has affected the management of the Loita forest. Household survey and participatory rural appraisal tools were used to collect data from households living within five kilometres from the edge of the forest. Analysis of the data was done using a SPSS software program. Findings from the...

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