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Institutional and Livelihood Changes in East African Forest Landscapes

Decentralization and Institutional Change for Sustainable Forest Management in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Ethiopia

Edited By Franz Gatzweiler

This book presents research articles and essays which analyze the consequences of decentralization on forest conditions and livelihoods in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Ethiopia. Authors from the East African collaborative research centers of the International Forestry Resources and Institutions (IFRI) Research Program demonstrate that the institutional changes resulting from decentralization create costs for those who need to re-institutionalize and re-organize the management of forest and land resources. This requires investment into information, communication, education and into the re-building of social capital. Cases in which collective action has worked and contributed to improving livelihoods and forest conditions can be exemplary, while failures can be equally useful for learning about East Africa and beyond.

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Chapter 13 Property Right Regimes and Sustainable Forest Management: Lessons from fourteen Years of Monitoring of Forest Resources in Uganda: Namaalwa Justine, Abwoli Y. Banana and William Gombya-Ssembajjwe

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231 Chapter 13 Property Right Regimes and Sustainable Forest Management: Lessons from fourteen Years of Monitoring of Forest Resources in Uganda Namaalwa Justine, Abwoli Y. Banana and William Gombya-Ssembajjwe 13.1 Abstract In Sub-Saharan Africa, the major problems facing natural forest resource manage- ment have been deforestation and forest degradation. Lack of clearly defined and enforced property rights, leading to a de facto open access situation, has been pointed out as the major cause. National governments have been urged to reme- dy the situation through tenure changes such as privatisation and decentraliza- tion. This chapter is based on the UFRIC study in Uganda and aims at investigat- ing whether well defined and enforced property rights are a necessary and/or sufficient condition for sustainable forest management. This is done using 28 UFRIC forest sites under either private or government governance arrangements. The analysis indicates that both the State and private-owned forests experience high degradation and deforestation levels, but with high variations across the continuum for each governance regime. The paper concludes that establishing appropriate forms of tenure to delineate boundaries and limit exploitation consti- tutes an important step towards achieving sustainability. However, we need to iden- tify other factors/conditions to complement this step in achieving sustainability. It therefore adds to other studies which show that the theoretical and policy pers- pectives concerning appropriate property rights for resources requires recogni- tion of the specific historical, socioeconomic, political and ecological contexts. 13.2 Introduction Sustainable management of forest resources poses one of the world’s greatest...

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