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Institutional and Livelihood Changes in East African Forest Landscapes

Decentralization and Institutional Change for Sustainable Forest Management in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Ethiopia

Edited By Franz Gatzweiler

This book presents research articles and essays which analyze the consequences of decentralization on forest conditions and livelihoods in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Ethiopia. Authors from the East African collaborative research centers of the International Forestry Resources and Institutions (IFRI) Research Program demonstrate that the institutional changes resulting from decentralization create costs for those who need to re-institutionalize and re-organize the management of forest and land resources. This requires investment into information, communication, education and into the re-building of social capital. Cases in which collective action has worked and contributed to improving livelihoods and forest conditions can be exemplary, while failures can be equally useful for learning about East Africa and beyond.

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Chapter 16 Contribution of Forestry to Household Income and District Revenue in Uganda: Concepta Mukasa, Alice Tibazalika, Harriet N. Muloki, David Obot, and William Gombya-Ssembajjwe

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295 Chapter 16 Contribution of Forestry to Household Income and District Revenue in Uganda Concepta Mukasa, Alice Tibazalika, Harriet N. Muloki, David Obot, and William Gombya-Ssembajjwe 16.1 Abstract This study assessed the contribution of forestry to household income as well as the district revenue basket in Uganda. Specifically, we identified, categorized and prioritized the various forestry products and forestry-based enterprises ac- cording to their contribution to household incomes and the district revenue basket. A formal survey involving a sample 501 households, 49 sub-county political and technical leaders, 92 forestry-based entrepreneurs and 33 district political and technical leaders in five districts of Dokolo, Hoima, Mubende, Mukono and Tororo was conducted. Forestry contributed a commendable amount of revenue to districts that had natural forests; but negligible amounts to districts without natural forests. The three major forestry products prioritized as contributing to household income were fruits (assorted), charcoal and firewood respectively. Charcoal was said to be more rewarding at household level. Similarly, three major forest-based enterprises prioritized as contributing to household income and district revenue baskets were charcoal business (production and selling), timber trade and tree nursery management. Although at a household level there was generally a minimal investment into tree planting and management, contri- bution of forestry to household income is still important. Likewise, at the district level, forestry also contributes a significant amount of revenue to the total dis- trict revenue baskets especially to those districts blessed with natural forests. 16.2 Introduction The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)-National Forestry Programme...

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