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The House of Art

Modern Residences of Artists as the Subject and Space of Creation

Andrzej Pieńkos

The term «house of art» designates the cultural phenomenon and creative mode in modernity associated with an artist’s residence as his own creation and as his product of a need to create which is unfulfilled in the painter’s, writer’s or composer’s actual field. This book discusses the most important of these creations from the 18 th century to the beginning of the 20 th , including gardens as well as the artist’s space, broadly understood, annexed by his imagination. An artist’s shaping of his own residence was most commonly a secondary area of his creative work. The formula for a «house of art» is specific to the particular artist and does not have to fit within any given architectural or decorative style. It may conform to the traditions of a residence (artist’s palace, cottage etc), but most often it forms an individual case.

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[Unless otherwise stated, photos by A. Pieńkos] Introduction 1. Grasmere, Dove Cottage of W. and D. Wordsworth. 296 CH. 1 2. D. Ghirlandaio, St. Hieronymus in his study, fresco in the Ognissanti church in Florence, 1480. Detail. 297 3. Mantua, A. Mantegna’s House. Courtyard. 4. Mantua, A. Mantegna’s House. Courtyard. 298 5. Mantua, G. Romano’s House, 1544. Main entrance. 6. Milan, Casa degli Omenoni, L.Leoni’s House, 1549–65. 299 7. Milan, Casa degli Omenoni, L.Leoni’s House, 1549–65. 8. Starigrad, Hvar, Trvdalj – the residence of Petar Hektorović, built after 1514. 300 9. Starigrad, Hvar, Trvdalj – latin inscription on the facade. 10. Rome, Palazzo Zuccari, the former garden gate, 1593–1603. 301 11. Antwerp, F. Floris’ House, 1563, façade, engraving after J. van Croes. 12. Antwerp, F. Floris’ House, 1563; Allegory of the Arts, engraving by Monogrammist TG after Floris’ painting on the façade. 302 13. Antwerp, P.P. Rubens’ house, view of the courtyard and the garden in 1684; engraving by F. Harrewijn. © Trustees of the British Museum. 14. Antwerp, P.P. Rubens’ house, view of the garden and the back of the house in 1692; engraving by F. Harrewijn. © Trustees of the British Museum. 303 15. Antwerp, P.P. Rubens’ house, detail of the main building. 16. Stockholm, the palace of N. Tessin. Main entrance with sculptures of B. Foucquet, c. 1697. 304 17. Stockholm, the palace of N. Tessin. Courtyard. 18. Prague, the garden pavilion of M.B. Braun, demolished; engraving of M. Renzo and J.D. Montalegre after the...

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